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As I understand, WinRT is a different version of WPF written without using the underlying Win32 APIs.

What's the relation of WinRT and WPF? Will WPF work under Metro in Windows 7 or will it launch the classic desktop?

That's not so clear from the Keynote. If someone has Windows 8 installed can confirm it's behaviour.

Thanks

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Expect the worse when you're coming from WPF. Lots of things were removed.. –  Tom Kerkhove Jun 28 '12 at 14:07

5 Answers 5

WinRT is a replacement for the Winapi. The api is native, very unlike WPF that runs as a layer on top of the CLR. It certainly resembles WPF, part of what causes confusion. It adopted the metadata format of managed code, replacing type libraries of old. And uses XAML for UI designs, much like WPF, Silverlight and Windows Phone. You can still write WPF apps for Windows 8 but your app can't be published through the store, won't integrate with the Metro desktop nor will it run on tablets that are based on the ARM core. Whether that's a real problem depends a great deal on how well Metro will do in the market place.

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There is no relation between WPF and WinRT, just like there is no relation between Silverlight and WPF. Now we have three technologies, WPF, Silverlight and WinRT.

If you try to execute WPF application, it will not execute on Metro, it will execute in the classical desktop only.

In Visual Studio 2011, you have WPF and Metro as two different types of applications, and Xaml for WPF and WinRT is not same, Xaml for WinRT is pretty much same as that of Silverlight as lot of classes which exist for WPF are missing in WinRT library. But most of classes that exist for Silverlight are available in WinRT.

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Windows Runtime (WinRT) is an alternative API used to create Metro Applications (and later server application).

The APIs are class/method/struct based and surfaced to .Net metro apps, html5/css3/javascript apps and C/C++ metro applications.

The implementation is native.

APIs are made visible via .winmd files, which contain metadata very similar to the metadata you have in .Net assemblies.

The APIs are designed to secure and async friendly with many APIs requiring the use of async/await due to them potentially taking more than 50msec to execute.

It includes a subset of Win32 APIs and COM apis.

Anyway... the followings links help... channel9 also has some //Build/ videos on the subject..

Metro style app development - http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/apps/

Win32 and COM for Metro style apps - http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/apps/br205757(v=VS.85).aspx

APIs for Metro style apps - http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/apps/br211369(v=VS.85).aspx

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WinRT is a new library that you can use XAML, but not WPF.

WPF is primarily uses DirectX for visual.

You can use WinRT with:

  • XAML
    • C#
    • C++
    • VB.NET
  • HTML/JS/CSS
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Does WPF switch to classic desktop or works under Metro? Thanks –  bstodos Oct 8 '11 at 14:29
    
WPF is for desktop applications, not metro. Metro apps have to be written AFAIK with WinRT. –  Daniel A. White Oct 8 '11 at 14:31
    
But we should be able to easily port our WPF Models and ViewModels over to WinRT, and only have to rewrite our Views? –  Aaron Murgatroyd Jul 14 '12 at 15:57
    
i think that is the intent, if you use a portable class library. –  Daniel A. White Jul 14 '12 at 19:10

WinRT is a non managed API based on COM interfaces. You use it by calling objects buit in .winmd metadata files ( Windows\System32\WinMedataData directory).

All the namespaces begin with "Windows.".

You can write your Windows 8 application by using XAML files, but that's the only common point with WPF.

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