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I am making a Server/Client program in Java. The server waits for a connection then makes a new thread for that connection. The server then goes back and listens for connections on other ports.

sck = srvrSckt.accept();
server.numConnections++;
System.out.print("Connection was made on " + server.port[i] + ".\n");
Connections conn = new Connections(sck);
server.threads[i] = new Thread(conn);
server.threads[i].start();

After a connection has been made, I want to go back and check if any previous connections have closed. Then I will mark these ports as available for future connections to be made on. Is there a way to do this?

I have read that the best way to communicate between threads is with a shared variable. However, I cannot find a good example of this. Also, I am not sure if a shared variable would work because I not only want to check for connections that were successfully closed, but also for connections that were disconnected abruptly.

Any help you can offer will be greatly appreciated. Thank-you.

EDIT:

Here is a larger portion of the code. That may make my question more clear.

if (server.isAvailable[i] == true)
{
    availablePort = server.allPorts[i];
    server.isAvailable[i] = false;
    ServerSocket srvrSckt = new ServerSocket(availablePort);
    System.out.println("Waiting for connection on port " + availablePort + "...");
    srvrSckt.setSoTimeout(5000);
    try {
        sck = srvrSckt.accept();
        server.numConnections++;
        System.out.print("Connection was made on " + server.port[i] + ".\n");
        Connections conn = new Connections(sck);
        server.threads[i] = new Thread(conn);
        server.threads[i].start();
    } catch (Exception e) {
    server.isAvailable[i] = true; // no connection was made
    srvrSckt.close();
}
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1  
What do you mean you will mark these ports as avalaible?You have X number of ports open and you want to server only 1 request per port?I do not get your question –  Cratylus Oct 8 '11 at 18:28
    
What ports? A TCP server only uses one port. You don't have to manage it at all, let alone mark it as available for future connections. And 'client threads' aren't closed, client connections are closed. Your question remains obscure. Please restate. –  EJP Oct 9 '11 at 0:58
    
@user985637, You may want to select one post as your accepted answer,a very good practice on SO. –  Bhaskar Oct 9 '11 at 18:18

2 Answers 2

To my understanding, you have absolutely no control over assigning ports to incoming remote TCP connections. That's the job of the operating system. A socket is closed when Socket.isClosed returns true or when Socket.getInputStream.read returns -1 indicating end of stream.

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1  
Socket.isClosed() returns true when you have closed that socket. It doesn't tell you when the peer has closed the connection: the EOS does that. –  EJP Oct 9 '11 at 3:04

After a connection has been made, I want to go back and check if any previous connections have closed

Normally , the best way to detect on the server the end of a session with a client is to set up of the "goodbye-protocol" between client and server. A fixed token is posted by the client to server and server acknowledges by closing the channel. If the client terminates abruptly , then the only way on server to know about this is to setup a heart-beat protocol, every certain time of inactivity , the server will ping client and the client must respond by pingback. If there is no response , server must terminate the client session.

As for sharing a variable between threads , you may refer : http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/concurrency/sync.html

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Well, you don't need to make goodbye things and heart-beat implementations. TCP itself accepts timeout values before closing the connections, so if you don't recieve any information within this time, you could end your connection. –  SHiRKiT Oct 9 '11 at 14:12
    
Thank you! This answers my question. –  user985637 Oct 9 '11 at 16:07

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