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Long time user, first time poster. I've found similar questions/answers, typically involving subqueries, but I'm not sure how to apply to my situation.

I have 3 tables:

table1
id

table2
id | val (each id has 1 of 3 possible values)

table3
id | val (each id has 1 of 3 possible values)

EDIT: Example: (table1 = unique id of everyone who attended a theme park; table2 = which attraction each visitor visited first; table3 = which attraction each visitor visited second).

I want to write a query to look up 7 different counts: (1) count of the unique ids in table1 (2) count of the number of ids that have each of the possible values in table2 (3) count of the number of ids that have each of the possible values in table3

My MySQL query:

SELECT 
    count(DISTINCT table1.id) AS x1, 
    SUM(IF(table2.val='1'),1,0)) AS x2, 
    SUM(IF(table2.val='2'),1,0)) AS x3, 
    SUM(IF(table2.val='3'),1,0)) AS x4, 
    SUM(IF(table3.val='1'),1,0)) AS x5, 
    SUM(IF(table3.val='2'),1,0)) AS x6, 
    SUM(IF(table3.val='3'),1,0)) AS x7 
FROM 
    table1 
LEFT JOIN 
    table2 ON table1.id=table2.id 
LEFT JOIN 
    table3 ON table1.id=table3.id 

Results:

x1 = correct (because of DISTINCT)

x2,x3,x4 = correct

x5,x6,x7 = TWICE the number they should be (because I'm getting cartesian product?)

Any suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
Have you considered counting the tables separately in subselects, then joining the results of the two subqueries? –  Mark Byers Oct 8 '11 at 19:44
    
This may be what I need to do, but I've never done a subselect before and am not sure how to re-write my query in this manner. –  egret Oct 10 '11 at 8:51
    
USER ERROR. Turns out I had duplicate records in table 2. ids are supposed to be unique, but not forced to be in the table definition. Thus the double-counting. Thanks to all who commented on this. Trying every suggestion helped me to understand what was going on. –  egret Oct 10 '11 at 9:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

My guess is you issue is that id is not unique in table1. So even though it is unique in table2/3 (according to your description) each row in table2/3 is joined to two rows in table1 and thus counted twice. Has nothing to do with the left joins, normal inner joins would have the same issue.

If mysql (which I don't know real well) lets you do inline views like oracle does, then you can fix it by writing your query as:

SELECT 
    count(view1.id)              AS x1, 
    SUM(IF(table2.val='1'),1,0)) AS x2, 
    SUM(IF(table2.val='2'),1,0)) AS x3, 
    SUM(IF(table2.val='3'),1,0)) AS x4, 
    SUM(IF(table3.val='1'),1,0)) AS x5, 
    SUM(IF(table3.val='2'),1,0)) AS x6, 
    SUM(IF(table3.val='3'),1,0)) AS x7 
FROM 
    (  SELECT DISTINCT table1.id
       FROM   table1
    ) view1
LEFT JOIN 
    table2 ON view1.id=table2.id 
LEFT JOIN 
    table3 ON view1.id=table3.id
share|improve this answer
    
The ids in table 1 are unique. Example: (table1 = unique id of everyone who attended a theme park; table2 = which attraction each visitor visited first; table3 = which attraction each visitor visited second). I'll edit my original post to add this (important/useful) information. –  egret Oct 10 '11 at 8:59
    
USER ERROR. Turns out I had duplicate records in table 2. ids are supposed to be unique, but not forced to be in the table definition. Thus the double-counting. This is probably the most correct answer since it identifies the possibility that ids are not unique. Thank you. –  egret Oct 10 '11 at 9:58

You are getting a Cartesian result. Since you are not showing how many "1", "2" or "3" counts per "ID", just do a select sum() from those tables by themselves. Since a sum with no group by will always result in ONE record, you don't need any join and it will pull the results of one record per each summary with no Cartesian result. Since your original query was LEFT JOIN to the others, the ID would have already existed on table 1, so why re-query count distinct in each sub-table.

SELECT
      SumForTable1.x1, 
      SumForTable2.x2,
      SumForTable2.x3,
      SumForTable2.x4,
      SumForTable3.x5,
      SumForTable3.x6,
      SumForTable3.x7
   FROM 
      ( select count(DISTINCT table1.id) AS x1
           from table1 ) SumForTable1,

      ( select SUM(IF(table2.val='1'), 1, 0)) AS x2, 
               SUM(IF(table2.val='2'), 1, 0)) AS x3, 
               SUM(IF(table2.val='3'), 1, 0)) AS x4
            from table2 ) SumForTable2,

      ( select SUM(IF(table3.val='1'), 1, 0)) AS x5, 
               SUM(IF(table3.val='2'), 1, 0)) AS x6, 
               SUM(IF(table3.val='3'), 1, 0)) AS x7
            from table3 ) SumForTable3
share|improve this answer
    
This would work in MySQL but you may want to write CROSS JOIN instead of JOIN to point out what these joins really are. –  ypercube Oct 10 '11 at 9:07
    
I think "cartesian result" is the reason for the double-counting. I must be counting the table3 records once for each id in table1, and again for each time the same id appears in table 2. However, I can't get your example to execute. I've tried a few things - re-wrote it a few ways - but still no luck. –  egret Oct 10 '11 at 9:15
    
@egret, sorry, I know you already have your answer apparently resolved, but I changed this. Since there is no "JOIN"ing going in, I just comma separated the FROM sources which will allow for Cartesian 1:1:1 all merged together. –  DRapp Oct 10 '11 at 19:29

I'd remove duplicates on every table:

SELECT
    count(t1.id) AS t1, 
    SUM(IF(t2.val=1,1,0)) AS t21, 
    SUM(IF(t2.val=2,1,0)) AS t22, 
    SUM(IF(t2.val=3,1,0)) AS t23, 
    SUM(IF(t3.val=1,1,0)) AS t31, 
    SUM(IF(t3.val=2,1,0)) AS t32, 
    SUM(IF(t3.val=3,1,0)) AS t33
FROM (SELECT DISTINCT * FROM table1) as t1
JOIN (SELECT DISTINCT * FROM table2) as t2 ON t1.id=t2.id 
JOIN (SELECT DISTINCT * FROM table3) as t3 ON t1.id=t3.id;
share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate the suggestion, but did not solve the double-counting. –  egret Oct 10 '11 at 8:54

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