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I have two tables:

TABLE 1
ID   VALUE   
1    ABC
2    DEF
3    GHI
4    JKL
5    XYZ

TABLE 2
ID  T1_ID  VALUE 
1   1      A
2   1      B
3   2      A
4   3      A
5   3      B
6   4      B 

I want to select all rows from TABLE 1 which have a TABLE 2 row for Values A AND B. This would be rows 1 and 3 (not 2 because it has only A, not 4 because it has only B). Can I do this without a subquery?

(Note: I also need to query against values in table 1 so I can't just query table 2.)

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Why do you need to do it without a subquery? –  GolezTrol Oct 8 '11 at 20:57
    
Subquery performance could be bad because table 2 is huge. –  Scott Wilson Oct 8 '11 at 21:07
    
Without a subquery you'll need a join, which can be just as bad. Best idea is to try different solutions and check for performance. Also depends on the database. MySQL is very good with left joins, and bad with subselects and IN filters, while in Oracle it's about the other way around. Which DB do you use? –  GolezTrol Oct 8 '11 at 21:12
    
I use MySQL as my db. –  Scott Wilson Oct 8 '11 at 23:07
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Tadaaah! Without a subquery.

select distinct
  t1.*
from
  Table1 t1
  inner join Table2 t2a on t2a.t1_ID = t1.ID and t2a.VALUE = 'A'
  inner join Table2 t2b on t2b.t1_ID = t1.ID and t2b.VALUE = 'B'
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SELECT t1.ID,
       t1.VALUE
FROM   Table1 t1
       JOIN Table2 t2
         ON t1.ID = t2.T1_ID
WHERE  t2.VALUE IN ( 'A', 'B' )
GROUP  BY t1.ID,
          t1.VALUE
HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT t2.VALUE) = 2
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Different solution alltogether. Maybe OP can test your solution against mine for performance. Wonder which is better. –  GolezTrol Oct 8 '11 at 21:10
    
With good indexes I would have thought the JOIN would be better. Less easily extendible to an arbitrary number of items though. Would help to know the RDBMS too... –  Martin Smith Oct 8 '11 at 21:17
    
Because of the complexity of the query, the first answer was easier to integrate. –  Scott Wilson Oct 8 '11 at 23:05
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