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I have a while loop here that only takes in 1 and 2 as the number, if i insert and number that is not these my else statement will keep asking for the correct one, which works correctly. But if i insert a letter my else statement loops forever. How can i fix this?

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
int myChoice;
cin >> myChoice;

while ( myChoice >= 2 ||  myChoice <= 1)
{
    if (myChoice == 1)
    {
        cout <<"food1";
        break;
    }
    else if (myChoice == 2)
    {
        cout <<"food2";
        break;
    }
    else
    {
        cout << " " << endl;
        cout << "Please select the proper choices" << endl;
        cout << "Try again: ";
        cin >> myChoice;
    }
}
return 0;
}
share|improve this question
2  
Your while condition is always true. – JohnPS Oct 8 '11 at 22:08
    
I messed up my while condition? – sonicboom Oct 8 '11 at 22:11
1  
Well, it's always true because myChoice will always be greater than or equal to 2 OR less than or equal to 1, So using while(true) would do the same thing. You could change things around to make it simpler. See my answer. – JohnPS Oct 8 '11 at 22:20
up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you enter a non-number, then cin >> myChoice fails. That means that it leaves the input intact in the input buffer and when you get there again it tries to parse it and fails, and so on... You must clear the error state and ignore the non-digits. The simplest way is something like this:

cout << "Try again: ";
cin.clear(); // clear error state
cin.ignore(std::numeric_limits<streamsize>::max(), '\n'); // ignore till the end of line
cin >> myChoice;
share|improve this answer
    
The guy below was talking about clearning the buffer. I guess this is more reasonable since we dont even take it. But how would we clear the buffer? – sonicboom Oct 8 '11 at 21:57
    
@mystycs: you cannot really clear the buffer in a cross-platform way, since it's a stream and thus any reading from it will refill the buffer. You can just ignore everything in the buffer till the end of the line, as I showed above. – ybungalobill Oct 8 '11 at 21:59
    
Ah so this is the standard way of doing it then i assume? – sonicboom Oct 8 '11 at 22:03
    
But my code was tackled correctly other than the letter thing right? – sonicboom Oct 8 '11 at 22:04
1  
@mystycs: yes. Also theoretically you should differentiate between failed input (cin.fail()), succeeded input but incorrect value, and EOF (cin.eof()). – ybungalobill Oct 8 '11 at 22:06

The problem here is that the cin >> operator expects to receive an int input and receives a char input.

The istream module, of which cin is an instance, is using buffered I/O. This means that the user input is first stored in a buffer, and then read from that buffer when the user program accesses the >> operator. Ordinarily, if the >> operator succeeds in reading and parsing the user input, the read data is extracted from the buffer and the next invocation of the >> operator would continue where the last call left off. In you case, however, the >> operator attempts to parse the user input as a number and fails since it contains illegal chars which are not digits. The >> operator doesn't extract the read data from the buffer in this case and this same data is being referred to over and over again in the following calls to the >> operator.

You should empty the buffer on failure, the way ybungalobill suggested, for instance.

share|improve this answer
    
Okay i get it, how would you go about emptying the buffer? – sonicboom Oct 8 '11 at 21:55
    
Should i basically erase whats the the value by setting it back to 0? SO int myChoice = 0; in that else at the end? – sonicboom Oct 8 '11 at 21:56
1  
ybungalobill gave the way: cin.clear() removes the error flag from the isteam object, and cin.ignore() removes the data from the buffer, or "ignores" it, rather... – immortal Oct 8 '11 at 22:00

Your while condition is always true, then you use break to exit the loop. You could simplify things a bit like this:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
  int myChoice;
  cin >> myChoice;

  while( myChoice != 1 || myChoice != 2 ) {
    cout << endl;
    cout << "Please select the proper choices" << endl;
    cout << "Try again: ";
    cin.clear();
    cin.ignore(std::numeric_limits<streamsize>::max(), '\n');
    cin >> myChoice;
  }

  // At this point myChoice is 1 or 2

  if (myChoice == 1)
    cout << "food1";
  else if (myChoice == 2)
      cout << "food2";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ah i see myChoice != 1 && myChoice != 2 but actually myChoice != 1 || myChoice != 2 ended up working instead. Not and. – sonicboom Oct 8 '11 at 23:10
    
@mystycs - Oh, yes, thanks, I'll correct that. – JohnPS Oct 9 '11 at 0:40

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