Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was trying to write a code in c after long time, objective of program is to 1) print the last 10 lines of text file which is received as arguements. 2) display errors otherwise there is a problem with seek command which is got lost correcting it.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main ( int argc, char *argv[] )
{
    char buffer[20],c;
    int bytes =512,flag=0;
    if ( argc != 2 ) /* argc should be 2 for correct execution */
    {
        /* We print argv[0] assuming it is the program name */
        printf( "usage: %s filename", argv[0] );
    }
    else 
    {
        // We assume argv[1] is a filename to open
        FILE *file = fopen( argv[1], "r" );

        /* fopen returns 0, the NULL pointer, on failure */
        if ( file == 0 )
        {
            printf( "Could not open file\n" );
        }
        else 
        {
             while (1)
             {
                   sprintf (buffer, "seek(file,%d,0)", bytes);
                   system(buffer);
                   while ( (c=fgetc(file))!= EOF)
                   {
                         if(c=='\n')
                         {
                              flag++;
                         }
                   }
                   if (flag >= 10)
                      bytes=bytes*2;
                   else 
                        break;
             }

             flag-=10;
             sprintf (buffer, "seek(file,%d,0)", bytes);
             system(buffer);
             while(flag > 0)
             {
                  if((c=fgetc(file))=='\n')
                  {
                         flag--;
                  }
             }
             while ( (c=fgetc(file))!= EOF)
             {
                         printf("%c",c);
             }
        }
    }
}

Here's the error,

operable program or batch file. 'seek' is not recognized as an internal or external command, operable program or batch file.

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Wooble, therefromhere, tzot, Ken White, dmckee Oct 9 '11 at 22:18

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Since you're shelling out to the OS seek(file,%d,0) - is it in your path, etc. can you run it from your command line. –  Preet Sangha Oct 8 '11 at 22:46
    
Is this for practise of C? If you actually need the functionality use tail -n 10. Also is this C++ or C? –  therefromhere Oct 8 '11 at 22:53
    
@therefromhere This is c program, much of a practice on some box operating system. –  Abhilash Muthuraj Oct 8 '11 at 22:56
    
@AbhilashMuthuraj ok, so you don't want the C++ tag then, I'll remove it. –  therefromhere Oct 9 '11 at 1:50
add comment

3 Answers 3

In C, the system() function takes a string and interprets it as a shell command (just as if you typed it on the command line). This is different from a "syscall", which is a low-level call to the OS and is perhaps the source of your confusion here.

It looks like what you want to use is fseek():

fseek(file, bytes, SEEK_SET);

This would replace the calls to sprintf and system.

share|improve this answer
add comment
system(buffer);

You are actually doing this : cmd seek. So the error is correct. There is no seek program installed in windows by default.

share|improve this answer
add comment

What is this system command 'seek'? Don't you want C function fseek instead?

share|improve this answer
    
is fseek same as seek command? I mean syntax is same? –  Abhilash Muthuraj Oct 8 '11 at 22:46
    
@Abhilash Muthuraj we don't know because c does not have a seek in the language or the standard library. Whatever seek you are using comes from the OS, and you haven't said what that is (it's not a POSIX system which also does not have seek but does have lseek). –  dmckee Oct 9 '11 at 22:17
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.