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How can I save the value of the title for a row? These are the values of the title=%s:

<a class="false" title=1106 href="/useradminpage?main_id=%s&display=false"><span class="small">(hide)</span></a>

<a class="false" title=1153 href="/useradminpage?main_id=%s&display=false"><span class="small">(hide)</span></a>

<a class="false" title=1175 href="/useradminpage?main_id=%s&display=false"><span class="small">(hide)</span></a>

...

I've tried countless variations but none of them work. This is what I have now:

<script>

$(document).ready(function() {

    console.log("ready");

    $("a.false").click(function(e) {
        $(this).closest("tr.hide").hide("slow");
        var main_id = a.title;
        var display = "false";
        e.preventDefault();

    });

    $("a.false").click(function() {

        $.ajax({
            url: "/useradminpage?main_id=%s&display=false",
            data: {main_id: "main_id", display: "display"},
            success: function(data) {
            display_false()
            alert("4 - returned");
            }

        });

    });
});
</script>

This is the third question on this topic. I appreciate any help. Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
The values for your title attributes really ought to be in quotes –  Clive Oct 8 '11 at 23:37
    
@ Clive: As others mentioned var main_id = this.title; works, giving the value of the title. –  Zeynel Oct 9 '11 at 0:24
    
I meant in your HTML code :-) title=1106 should be title="1106". It's just good practice –  Clive Oct 9 '11 at 0:26
    
Ok, thanks, fixed. For some reason I thought I did not need to put quotes when I was using string formatting with %s. –  Zeynel Oct 9 '11 at 0:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think what you're trying to do is pass the value of the title attribute along in your AJAX request. If that's the case, the easiest thing to do will be to do it all in one event handler (is there a reason you're binding 2 different handlers to the same event?):

$("a.false").click(function(e) {
    $(this).closest("tr.hide").hide("slow");
    var main_id = this.title;
    var display = "false";
    e.preventDefault();
    $.ajax({
        url: "/useradminpage",
        data: {main_id: main_id, display: display},
        success: function(data) {
            display_false();
            alert("4 - returned");
        }

    });
});

Your problem currently is that main_id and display are not in the scope of the second event listener, so will be undefined (and they shouldn't be quoted, otherwise you're just passing in strings). As you're passing in a data object to the ajax function, you don't really need to add the query string to the URL either.

Aside from that, when you assign a value to main_id, you're using a.title. In this case a is undefined, and you will need to use this, which will be a reference to the clicked element.

share|improve this answer
    
@ James Allardice: Thanks! This looks beautiful and it works great and thanks for the detailed explanation. Can you clarify one more thing? I thought mistakenly that I needed to call the function that updated the database in success: that's why I have display_false(); in there. But that line gives a Uncaught ReferenceError: display_false is not defined and when I comment out that line database is still updated. So what do I need to put inside success:? Documentation says "A function to be called if the request succeeds" so that confuses me. Thanks again. –  Zeynel Oct 9 '11 at 0:18
1  
I think what you've done is tried to call a PHP function from the JavaScript inside the success callback. That's never going to work, because PHP executes on the server, and JS on the client side. The success callback is simply a function that runs when the AJAX call finishes execution. You could, for example, use it to display a "success" message to the user. –  James Allardice Oct 9 '11 at 0:25

instead of

    var main_id = a.title;

try

    var main_id = $(this).attr('title');

because if I'm not wrong, "a" isn't defined

share|improve this answer

I suspect that I might be missing something, but I suspect that your problem is using a.title instead of this.title:

$("a.false").click(function(e) {
    $(this).closest("tr.hide").hide("slow");
    var main_id = this.title; // or you could use the jQuery object approach: $(this).attr('title') instead
    var display = "false";
    e.preventDefault();
});

The problem in your original approach is that a would be parsed as a variable, which hasn't been assigned a value, nor has it been declared, so that it would return undefined or null (at best). Within the scope of the each() method, you're iterating over individual nodes; so to access the properties/attributes of that node use this.

share|improve this answer
    
@ David Thomas: Thanks. Yes, I was getting a undefined error in the browser. –  Zeynel Oct 9 '11 at 0:22

To access any attribute of a DOM element through jQuery, you can use the .attr() function. In your particular case you would do.

var main_id = $(this).attr('title');
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