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Is there any convention over the algorithm used to make the layouts of structs on C?

I want to be able to have a code running in a vm to be able to have structures compatible with their C counterparts, just like C# interop works. For this I will need to know how the alignment algorithm works. I gather there must be a convetion for that, as it works nicely on C#. I have in mind the probable algorithm they have used to work this out, but I haven't found any proof it is the right one.

Here's how I think it works:

for each declared field (by order of declaration)

  • See if the field fits in the remaining bytes (until next alignment)
  • If it doesn't fit, align this field; otherwise add it to current offset

for example, on a 32-bit system for a struct like:

{
byte b1;
byte b2;
int32 i1;
byte b3;
}

would be like this with this algorithm:

{
byte b1;
byte b2;
byte[2] align1;
int32 i1;
byte b3;
byte[3] align2;
}
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1  
I would suggest reading my answer here: stackoverflow.com/questions/6963998/… –  R.. Oct 9 '11 at 1:41
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Actually that answer is about size, not offsets, but the algorithm easily determines the offsets as well. –  R.. Oct 9 '11 at 1:44
    
@R.. Wow! Really great answer!! You should post it as an answer here, as it's really more precise. Just a question, though, when you say round for the alignment of the type, you mean that if for example on your example you had a short b instead of int b, it would be aligned to offset 2, instead of 1? –  Waneck Oct 9 '11 at 1:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In general, structure alignment in C depends on the compiler used, and especially the compiler options in effect at the time the structure declaration is processed. You can't make any general assumptions except to say that for a particular structure in a particular program compiled with particular settings, the structure layout can be determined.

That said, your guess closely matches what most compilers are likely to do with default alignment settings.

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Might also be worth pointing out that compilers often have a way to specify a packed struct, ie. no padding at all. I can't think of a single compiler I've used on a PC that didn't have a way to do that (may affect performance if you don't manually pad it to an efficient alignment). –  Dmitri Oct 9 '11 at 1:06
    
That's true. Packed structures are almost always available but almost never the default. –  Greg Hewgill Oct 9 '11 at 1:09
    
Fair enough! I was hoping for too much to expect a standardized behavior from the c compilers ! But it's great to know that the algorithm I sketched will be default, that should suffice (C#'s InteropServices should work the same way, and they offer a way to explicitly define the offsets). Thank you! –  Waneck Oct 9 '11 at 1:35
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Packed structures have a lot more problems that you would think. I would consider them fundamentally beyond broken. For example, even if x is an element of type int in foo, &foo.x may not be a valid int * you can pass to other functions! –  R.. Oct 9 '11 at 1:36
1  
@Waneck: It's entirely standard between any two compilers for the same ABI (and almost certainly the same for any two compilers for the same ISA (Instruction Set Architecture)). In any case, in the real world the algorithm will always be exactly as I described in the answer I linked to (as a comment on the question). –  R.. Oct 9 '11 at 1:43

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