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Why when I have records like (ratings = varchar)

A - 100
B - 70
C - 30

Then

SELECT * FROM `videos` ORDER BY `rating` DESC

Gives

A - 30
B - 70
C - 100

and

SELECT * FROM `videos` ORDER BY `rating` ASC

Gives

A - 100
B - 70
C - 30

But when the (ratings = tinyint)

SELECT * FROM `videos` ORDER BY `rating` DESC

Gives

A - 100
B - 70
C - 30
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i cant see the difference between first and last query –  Dzoki Oct 9 '11 at 0:29
    
i changed the rating column from varchar to tinyint, that fixed it. I want to know why. –  Shane Larson Oct 9 '11 at 0:33
    
aha sorry i didnt see it lmao. –  Dzoki Oct 9 '11 at 0:34
    
your sample outputs don't make sense to me. Wouldn't A and B be reversed for your first two queries –  Conrad Frix Oct 9 '11 at 2:43

2 Answers 2

you can try:

SELECT * FROM videos ORDER BY rating, videos DESC
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I already found the solution, I just want to know why when the column is varchar it don't work, and when its tinyint it works. –  Shane Larson Oct 9 '11 at 0:32

When you have a varchar column, the length of the text data and the fact the char '0' comes before char '1' (rather than after char '9') affects the sort order.

e.g. compare

select '100' as col1 
union all 
select '70' as col1
order by col1 asc

with

select '100' as col1 
union all 
select '070' as col1
order by col1 asc

You can get around this by suitably padding all strings to the same length.

share|improve this answer
    
So as varchar with 3 rows 100, 76, 22. What would DESC be and why? I sorta got what your saying. –  Shane Larson Oct 9 '11 at 0:49

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