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My understanding is that finally clauses must *always* be executed if the try has been entered.

import random

from multiprocessing import Pool
from time import sleep

def Process(x):
  try:
    print x
    sleep(random.random())
    raise Exception('Exception: ' + x)
  finally:
    print 'Finally: ' + x

Pool(3).map(Process, ['1','2','3'])

Expected output is that for each of x which is printed on its own by line 8, there must be an occurrence of 'Finally x'.

Example output:

$ python bug.py 
1
2
3
Finally: 2
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "bug.py", line 14, in <module>
    Pool(3).map(Process, ['1','2','3'])
  File "/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/multiprocessing/pool.py", line 225, in map
    return self.map_async(func, iterable, chunksize).get()
  File "/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/multiprocessing/pool.py", line 522, in get
    raise self._value
Exception: Exception: 2

It seems that an exception terminating one process terminates the parent and sibling processes, even though there is further work required to be done in other processes.

Why am I wrong? Why is this correct? If this is correct, how should one safely clean up resources in multiprocess Python?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Short answer: SIGTERM trumps finally.

Long answer: Turn on logging with mp.log_to_stderr():

import random
import multiprocessing as mp
import time
import logging

logger=mp.log_to_stderr(logging.DEBUG)

def Process(x):
    try:
        logger.info(x)
        time.sleep(random.random())
        raise Exception('Exception: ' + x)
    finally:
        logger.info('Finally: ' + x)

result=mp.Pool(3).map(Process, ['1','2','3'])

The logging output includes:

[DEBUG/MainProcess] terminating workers

Which corresponds to this code in multiprocessing.pool._terminate_pool:

    if pool and hasattr(pool[0], 'terminate'):
        debug('terminating workers')
        for p in pool:
            p.terminate()

Each p in pool is a multiprocessing.Process, and calling terminate (at least on non-Windows machines) calls SIGTERM:

from multiprocessing/forking.py:

class Popen(object)
    def terminate(self):
        ...
            try:
                os.kill(self.pid, signal.SIGTERM)
            except OSError, e:
                if self.wait(timeout=0.1) is None:
                    raise

So it comes down to what happens when a Python process in a try suite is sent a SIGTERM.

Consider the following example (test.py):

import time    
def worker():
    try:
        time.sleep(100)        
    finally:
        print('enter finally')
        time.sleep(2) 
        print('exit finally')    
worker()

If you run it, then send it a SIGTERM, then the process ends immediately, without entering the finally suite, as evidenced by no output, and no delay.

In one terminal:

% test.py

In second terminal:

% pkill -TERM -f "test.py"

Result in first terminal:

Terminated

Compare that with what happens when the process is sent a SIGINT (C-c):

In second terminal:

% pkill -INT -f "test.py"

Result in first terminal:

enter finally
exit finally
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/home/unutbu/pybin/test.py", line 14, in <module>
    worker()
  File "/home/unutbu/pybin/test.py", line 8, in worker
    time.sleep(100)        
KeyboardInterrupt

Conclusion: SIGTERM trumps finally.

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finally re-raises the original exception unless you return from it. The exception is then raised by Pool.map and kills your entire application. The subprocesses are terminated and you see no other exceptions.

You can add a return to swallow the exception:

def Process(x):
  try:
    print x
    sleep(random.random())
    raise Exception('Exception: ' + x)
  finally:
    print 'Finally: ' + x
    return

Then you should have None in your map result when an exception occurred.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a useful workaround, but surely in any case the runtime shouldn't be allowed to be killed until all finally blocks have been run? –  Daniel Wagner-Hall Oct 9 '11 at 2:11
    
@Daniel Wagner-Hall: Pool.map is modeled after map, which also terminates when the function mapped raises an exception. Maybe (try it out) the child processes are terminated normally and actually do execute the finally - only because your main thread is killed first the output from the children is not read anymore. –  Jochen Ritzel Oct 9 '11 at 2:41

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