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I'm trying to write a driving simulation program and I need some help on the design. I have a interface called RoadObjects which for now contains vehicles and mammals. I need to implement different kind of cars such as trucks, sedans, semis. they have some methods in common and some unique. Later on, I will add other kinds of vehicles and mammals. I don't want to use inheritance and I am trying to do this according to design principles and patterns such as open-closed principle and factory. Now my question is, should I design it like this:

RoadObject interface

Vehicle extends RoadObject

Mammal extends RoadObject

SedanImpl implements Vehicle

TruckImpl implements Vehicle

People implements Mammal

...

...

or should I just not have vehicle and people interface and do this?

RoadObject interface

SedanImpl implements RoadObject

TruckImpl implements RoadObject

People implements RoadObject

New question: I want to use a factory pattern, to chose which kind of vehicles for example. So I make a VechicleImpl and VechicleImplFactory so it might look like this:

RoadObject interface

Vehicle extends RoadObject

VehicleImpl implements Vehicle

Mammal extends RoadObject

SedanImpl implements Vehicle

TruckImpl implements Vehicle

People implements Mammal

Is this kind of bad design? Because VehicleImpl will have a lot of duplicate methods of SedanImpl,TruckImpl etc. Or if I wanted to have an factory that createVehicle, where should this be?

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Modelling extra classes for Truck and Sedan may not be required at all, so having one VehicleImpl may fulfill all your requirements if you can map the information required for Truck and Sedan to your VehicleImpl. –  home Oct 9 '11 at 7:58
    
@home, but theres the issue of methods that are unique to truck and sedan –  Dan Oct 9 '11 at 8:18
    
Really, tell me :-) –  home Oct 9 '11 at 8:19
    
@Home ... they have some methods in common and some unique. Looks like he already did. –  Feisty Mango Oct 9 '11 at 12:43
    
@Dan In your question, you mentioned that you "don't want to use inheritance" and that you want to utilize the open-closed principle ... The open-closed principle depends on inheritance "closed for modification, open for extension". How do you plan to pull that off? Plus, you are already using inheritance it appears. –  Feisty Mango Oct 9 '11 at 12:45
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Both approaches are valid, whether you need an explicit abstraction for vehicles depends on your requirements. SedanImpl, TruckImpl etc. may share some features common to vehicles but not to humen/animals:

public interface Vehcile extends RoadObject
    getTires()
    getEngine()

As you tagged this in Java common abstract classes may be useful as well:

public abstract class AbstractVehicle implements Vehicle {
    private Integer tires = 4;

    public Integer getTires() { return this.tires; }

    /* ... */
}

So that TruckImpl can inherit from AbstractVehicle:

public class TruckImpl extends AbstractVehicle {
    /* ... */
}
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Something reasonable:

- public interface IRoadObject

- public class People implements IRoadObject

- public class Vehicle

- public class Truck extends Vehicle implements IRoadObject

- public class Sedan extends Vehicle implements IRoadObject

However, it's still depending on the requirements. W/o clear requirements as yours, I guess this is simple enough.

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I think vehicle & people is a good idea. I would use abstract classes for this.

Also think about behaviors. A school bus has some different behaviors than a motorcycle, and you can implement these with interfaces.

Look around here for some more ideas.

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