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I have an array: x = [ [1, 2], 1, 1, [2, 1, [1, 2]] ] in which I want to count every occurrence of the number 1, and store that number in the variable one_counter. x.count(1) returns only 2 occurrences of 1, which is insufficient.

My code below serves my purpose and stores 5 in one_counter, however it looks messy and feels unpythonic to me.

Any suggestions how I can improve its pythonicity and expand it into more-dimensional lists?

Thanks!

x = [[1, 2], 1, 1, [2, 1, [1, 2]]]

one_counter = 0

for i in x:
    if type(i) == list:
        for j in i:
            if type(j) == list:
                for k in j:
                    if k == 1:
                        one_counter += 1

            else:
                if j == 1:
                    one_counter += 1

    else:
        if i == 1:
            one_counter += 1
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1  
What does scale have to do with this? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 9 '11 at 7:26
    
@IgnacioVazquez-Abrams I guess he overused the word Scale,he might have meant expansion of his datatype into more dimensional lists. –  DhruvPathak Oct 9 '11 at 7:38
    
@DhruvPathak Yes, sir! I misunderstood that for scale. –  Shon Freelen Oct 9 '11 at 7:51
    
So how did you end up with this list, and why do you need this count? The whole thing seems oddly artificial. –  Karl Knechtel Oct 9 '11 at 8:50
    
@Karl Would you be upset if I said it was me practicing, hitting a road block, and asking for help? –  Shon Freelen Oct 11 '11 at 3:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You could use recursion:

def flatten_count(iterable, element):
    count = 0
    for item in iterable:
        if item == element:
            count += 1
        if isinstance(item, list):
            count += flatten_count(item, element)
    return count

Or more concisely:

def flatten_count(iterable, element):
    return sum(
        flatten_count(item, element) if isinstance(item, list) else item == element
        for item in iterable 
    )

Use like this:

>>> x = [[1, 2], 1, 1, [2, 1, [1, 2]]]
>>> print(flatten_count(x, 1))
5
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks so much, Mark! That makes perfect sense, and now I understand recursion better along with the handiness that is isinstance(). –  Shon Freelen Oct 9 '11 at 8:06

A hacky solution, working by conversion of datatype to string : http://codepad.org/vNEv6B8M

import re
x = [ [1, 2], 1, 1, [2, 1, [1, 2]] ]
nums = [int(i) for i in re.findall(r'\d+', str(x))]
print(nums.count(1))
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I think it's better to separate this task into 2 parts.

Part 1

Part 1 is to create an generator which will flatten the input list.

def flatten_list(L):
    for i in L:
        if isinstance(i,list):
            for j in flatten_list(i):
                yield j
        else:
            yield i

Testing the output:

x = [[1, 2], 1, 1, [2, 1, [1, 2]]]

for i in flatten_list(x):
    print i

Output:

1
2
1
1
2
1
1
2

Part 2

Part 2 is to use the flattened list to count the number of occurrences of 1 in it:

print(sum(i==1 for i in flatten_list(x))) 

Output:

5

Note that i==1 returns True if i=1, and False if i is not equal to 1. But Trueis equal to 1 and False is equal to 0, so sum just calculates the number of True occurrences (which is equal to 5 in this case).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for breaking it down. I really appreciate it. –  Shon Freelen Oct 11 '11 at 3:52

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