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This is just an imaginary problem, I'm hoping that the solution will help in whole range of similar scenarios. Suppose I need to count total size of all external resources on a webpage (images, scripts etc.). I download the page, extract all SRC information and transform the URL list into download tasks:

async Task<int> GetTotalSize(Uri uri) {
  string[] urls = ... code to extract all external resources' URLs from given page ...

  var tasks = from url in urls.Distinct()
                select new WebClient().DownloadDataTaskAsync(new Uri(url));
  var files = await TaskEx.WhenAll(tasks);
  return files.Sum(file => file.Length);
}

Now, if one of the links is unreachable for any reason, the whole TaskEx.WhenAll is aborted with WebException. What I need is to ignore any WebExceptions inside individual tasks and assume length of 0 in that case. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
well, it's WebClient.DownloadDataTaskAsync()... –  Endrju Oct 9 '11 at 8:57
    
Whoops, brain fart, sorry about that. –  Frédéric Hamidi Oct 9 '11 at 8:58
    
I know this is a really old question and I doubt you're still struggling with the same problem. But I would just create a class that encapsulates all of the information that you need to process the web pages: the page data, the exception, success/fail status, etc. Then call WebClient().DownloadDataTaskAsync() from within a method that returns an instance of this class. –  HiredMind Jan 30 '12 at 21:36
    
@HiredMind thanks much for your comment. I liked Jeff's answer mainly because it didn't need the separate class. I'm a (becoming) fan of functional programming and thus I have to (and I want to) hate stateful objects, especially if they are not needed. I prefer to do most work in Select(), Where() and Aggregate(), and leave classes for UI / Web, which would be difficult otherwise. –  Endrju Jan 31 '12 at 6:39
    
Actually I was referring to a non-primitive return value - instead of returning Task<int>, returning Task<DownloadResult>. The Task<> class is the only thing keeping any state. I too hate stateful objects :-) –  HiredMind Feb 1 '12 at 23:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Just add a separate (asynchronous) method to get the size of a single url. Then add them up.

e.g.,

static async Task<int> GetTotalSizeAsync(params string[] urls)
{
    if (urls == null)
        return 0;
    var tasks = urls.Select(GetSizeAsync);
    var sizes = await TaskEx.WhenAll(tasks);
    return sizes.Sum();
}

static async Task<int> GetSizeAsync(string url)
{
    try
    {
        var str = await new WebClient().DownloadStringTaskAsync(url);
        return str.Length;
    }
    catch (WebException)
    {
        return 0;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, very simple and elegant. Works nicely, and the most important is that is still asynchronous. I was stuck in thinking about putting something inline in .Select() –  Endrju Oct 9 '11 at 9:44
    
Old thread, but I wanted to point out that what the OP requested would have had all the calls made in parallel. The solution is asynchronous, but no longer done in parallel. –  Dan Friedman Feb 7 '14 at 17:17
    
@Dan: It is done in parallel. Having a loop where each iteration is run asynchronously effectively makes it parallel. –  Jeff Mercado Feb 7 '14 at 17:23
    
When the code reaches await new WebClient().DownloadStringTaskAsync(url) the thread will stop work until it completes. In order for it to be parallel, you need to remove the await keyword. –  Dan Friedman Feb 7 '14 at 17:37

This solution allows for both asynchronous and parallel execution, which the currently accepted answer from Jeff does not.

var tasks = from url in urls.Distinct()
            select new WebClient().DownloadDataTaskAsync(new Uri(url));

try
{
    await TaskEx.WhenAll(tasks);
}
catch(Exception)
{
}

var files = tasks
    .Where(f => !f.IsFaulted)
    .Select(f => f.Result);

return files.Sum(file => file.Length);

Borrow from http://stackoverflow.com/a/15857555/1152054

share|improve this answer
    
I like this solution. –  tofutim Mar 11 at 23:17

I don't think you can avoid the aggregateexception with the above example - aggregateexception makes sense as the exception could be caused by non-webexception as well, for example cancellation. I believe the right pattern should be to handle the exception gracefully with a try catch block and if "file" does not have exception sum it up. Reed has a nice post explaining the very same http://reedcopsey.com/2010/07/19/parallelism-in-net-part-18-task-continuations-with-multiple-tasks/

Hope it helps

share|improve this answer
    
Please refrain from adding a signature to your posts, that's what your profile page and user cards are for. –  Jeff Mercado Oct 9 '11 at 9:00
    
The problem is not that it throws AggregateException (I was able to catch it simply with catch (WebException), but that single exception in single task aborts everything. Anyway thanks for suggestion and the article. –  Endrju Oct 9 '11 at 9:48

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