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I had the impression growing out of the applications by my work that when I define an ArrayList attribute in a class in Java 7, it is not necessary to initialize it (with new as a new Object) when I want to access it in a method for the first time. Nevertheless I receive always a nullPointerException error (on my personal home Computer), despite of having installed JDK1.7.0. Is there a newer version which I should install to overcome this annoying occurrence?

public class AdditionNode {

private VectorOperationCodeGen nodeCodeGen;
protected ArrayList<VectorInTree> connectedVectors;

... ... ...

public void inputVector(VectorInTree inputVector){

    if(inputFlag==2||inputFlag==0){

    if(this.connectedVectors.isEmpty()){

The last line evokes a nullPointerException. Should be so?

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Please post your code that doesn't work. –  MasterCassim Oct 9 '11 at 10:36
1  
It's correct that you get the NullPointerException, and it has always been so. Maybe "at work" the fields are pre-initialized like final List<String> names = Lists.newArrayList();. –  Roland Illig Oct 9 '11 at 10:38
    
What do you mean by "it is not necessary to initialize it (with new as a new Object)"? –  Eli Acherkan Oct 9 '11 at 10:38
1  
Your 'impression' is 100% incorrect. –  EJP Oct 9 '11 at 11:01
    
In fact, you are right. I had put the initialization in my “work applications” through the constructor. I needed to make some changes on the constructors and my negligence was that I forgot to initialize it on the new “versions” of constructors implemented. –  arjacsoh Oct 9 '11 at 11:12

6 Answers 6

I define an ArrayList attribute in a class in Java 7, it is not necessary to initialize it (with new as a new Object) when I want to access it in a method for the first time.

This is false. What gave you that impression ?

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I had the impression growing out of the applications by my work that when I define an ArrayList attribute in a class in Java 7, it is not necessary to initialize it

If you are to use the ArrayList, then you better initialize it.

By simply doing

ArrayList<SomeType> list;

you have just declared a reference to an ArrayList, and not actually created an ArrayList.

If you want to be "lazy" with the initialization, then whenever you need to access the list referred to by list, you'll have to do

ArrayList<SomeType> list;

// ...

if (list == null)
    list = new ArrayList<SomeType>();
list.add(someElement);
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Since the very beginning of Java the default value for references (which you call "ArrayList attribute") has been null. This will also not change in the future. Therefore someone must initialize them before using the list.

So this one simple declares a list reference and initializes it with null:

class MyClass {
    private ArrayList<String> list;
}

To declare and initialize it with an actual instance just do:

class MyClass {
    private ArrayList<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();
}

At Work you might use some frameworks, which can do nearly magical things for you. Better check out what framework are used and learn how they do their magic and, most importantly, when they do and when they don't do this magic.

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If I can say my opinion, yours it's a very strange impression. How can you use an object(such as an array list) without initialization and declaring a reference? Only referencing an object and initializing it, you can use that object.

If it would be possible what you're saying, it isn't necessary to have a reference of something on the memory and you have solved the problems of memory allocation. :-)

You should be clearer in your question.

EDIT

Now you have updated the question. Yes, it should be like you are saying. You are receiving NullPointerException from the compiler on the line if(this.connectedVectors.isEmpty()){, because you haven't initialized before with new operator the connectedVectors object.

If you are at the beginning with java programming, this is considered a typical error, and for now you are forgived :-) Even if the forgotten initialization of an object is considered a typical error of beginner programmer, this is an important and serious error, that you must not repeat.

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As far as i know, you can't avoid to initialize an object before using it. Even if this is true, you should initialize it anyway because if your user does not use the java version you're referring, he's gonna meet a lot of errors.

Still, I don't think that you can do what you're saying.

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This 'annoying occurrence' is part of the design of the Java Programming Language, and hasn't changed since the beginning. Your expectations/impressions are mistaken.

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