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Here 's my simple code:

int main() {
  double d1 = 10000000000.0;
  const double d2 = 10000000000.0;

  cout << static_cast<int>(d1) << endl;
  cout << static_cast<int>(d2) << endl;
  cout << static_cast<int>(10000000000.0) << endl;
}

The output is:

-2147483648
2147483647
2147483647

This surprised me grealy. Why would a positive double sometimes get casted to a negative int?

I'm using g++: GCC version 4.4.3 (Ubuntu 4.4.3-4ubuntu5).

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1  
Try different optimization levels. Seems like the output depends on those, too. –  Kerrek SB Oct 9 '11 at 13:00
3  
d1 is likely converted at run-time whereas the other two can be converted at compile-time. Since, as the answers point out, it is undefined here so those two conversion routines/instructions do not need to produce the same results. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Oct 10 '11 at 7:38
    
Thanks edA-qa mort-ora-y, this actually solved my question :) I tried g++ -O2 to compile, and the result is expected. –  Kai Oct 12 '11 at 3:20
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2 Answers

Casting a double to an int when int isn't big enough to hold the value yields undefined behaviour.

[n3290: 4.9/1]: A prvalue of a floating point type can be converted to a prvalue of an integer type. The conversion truncates; that is, the fractional part is discarded. The behavior is undefined if the truncated value cannot be represented in the destination type.

This behaviour is derived from C:

[C99: 6.3.1.4/1]: When a finite value of real floating type is converted to an integer type other than _Bool, the fractional part is discarded (i.e., the value is truncated toward zero). If the value of the integral part cannot be represented by the integer type, the behavior is undefined.

For you, int clearly isn't big enough.

  • And, in the first case, for you this just so happens to result in the sign bit being set.
  • In the second and third cases, again for you, it's probably optimisations that happen to result in different behaviour.

But don't rely on either (or, indeed, any) behaviour in this code.

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From the C standard (1999):
6.3.1.4 Real floating and integer
1 When a finite value of real floating type is converted to an integer type other than _Bool, the fractional part is discarded (i.e., the value is truncated toward zero). If the value of the integral part cannot be represented by the integer type, the behavior is undefined.

From the C++ standard (2003):
4.9 Floating-integral conversions [conv.fpint]
1 An rvalue of a floating point type can be converted to an rvalue of an integer type. The conversion truncates; that is, the fractional part is discarded. The behavior is undefined if the truncated value cannot be represented in the destination type. [Note: If the destination type is bool, see 4.12. ]

Most likely your double is too big to be converted correctly to int.

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1  
Correct; in this case, it's overflowing, setting the sign bit. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 9 '11 at 12:59
    
Thanks, do you have a link to the standard? And this is C++ code, any difference between C & C++ on this? –  Kai Oct 9 '11 at 13:01
    
@user758557: Alex already posted a citation from the standard. If you wish to purchase the standard in entirety, then that's up to you! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 9 '11 at 13:02
    
@user758557: you can get a free draft version of the most recent C standard or you can purchase the last official standard. Most of C stuff is exactly the same in C++. Most, but not everything. This is one of those many things that are the same. –  Alexey Frunze Oct 9 '11 at 13:04
    
@TomalakGeret'kal: added C++ standard excerpt too. –  Alexey Frunze Oct 9 '11 at 13:08
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