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I would like construct a public key which is constructed using C# XML RSAKeys, however I would like to reconstruct it using java, The problem is I receive the M & E themselves from the Key as bytes values, and to construct the key I've to use two BigIntegers, How do I construct the public key ?

Edit: The problem is the mod, exp byte arrays that was base64 decoded, are the M,N of the Public Key...

    byte[] mod  = Base64.decodeBase64(modulus.getBytes());
    byte[] exp  = Base64.decodeBase64(exponent.getBytes());

    int[] copyMod = new int[mod.length];

    for (int x = 0; x < mod.length; x++) {
        copyMod[x] = unsignedToBytes((byte) mod[x]);
    }

    int[] copyExp = new int[exp.length];

    for (int x = 0; x < exp.length; x++) {
        copyExp[x] = unsignedToBytes((byte) exp[x]);
    }

    String Mod =  Arrays.toString(copyMod);
    String Exp = Arrays.toString(copyExp);

    BigInteger m = new BigInteger(Mod.getBytes());
    BigInteger e = new BigInteger(Exp.getBytes());

        java.security.spec.RSAPublicKeySpec spec = new java.security.spec.RSAPublicKeySpec(m, e);
        KeyFactory keyFactory = KeyFactory.getInstance("RSA");
        PublicKey publicKey = keyFactory.generatePublic(spec);
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It would help quite a bit if you tell us, what class you want to feed with the information. –  A.H. Oct 9 '11 at 13:27
    
Oh he could tell us, but then he'd have to kill us. Get it? He's working on an RSA application. So it's like really secret. Never mind... –  Steve J Oct 9 '11 at 13:39
    
@SteveJ The problem is the m,n which I got from a base64 decoder, they come in byte arrays, and to create a public key I should convert those two arrays to Bigintegers, which is a wrong operarion... –  Ahmed Saleh Oct 9 '11 at 14:30
    
Ahmed, I was making a lame joke. I'll give this some thought, though I think the answers given show some people are quite knowledgeable about this topic. –  Steve J Oct 9 '11 at 15:20
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2 Answers

java.security.spec.RSAPublicKeySpec spec = new java.security.spec.RSAPublicKeySpec(m, e);
KeyFactory keyFactory = KeyFactory.getInstance("RSA");
PublicKey publicKey = keyFactory.generatePublic(spec);
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That won't give you the key, you'll have to feed it to a key factory (you can also pass it to bouncycastle's JCERSAPublicKey constructor). –  Artefacto Oct 9 '11 at 13:42
    
Yes indeed. I'll edit my answer. What's up with BountyCastle, though? The JRE comes with RSA support bundled. No need for any external library. –  JB Nizet Oct 9 '11 at 13:47
    
Sure, but for programs that heavily use cryptography, bouncycastle will help a lot, even if it's just for the JCA helpers. –  Artefacto Oct 9 '11 at 14:13
    
The problem is the m,n which I got from a base64 decoder, they come in byte arrays, and to create a public key I should convert those two arrays to Bigintegers, which is a wrong operarion... –  Ahmed Saleh Oct 9 '11 at 14:26
    
That was not obvious from your question. How is the XML file containing the public key created in C#? Without knowing that, it's impossible to know how to reconstruct the key from the XML. You should add the C# tag to your question and be more explicit about the way the XML file is built. –  JB Nizet Oct 9 '11 at 14:33
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You don't tell us what object type you want. But if you want an RSA public key, you can do (BouncyCastle):

RSAPublicKey rsaPubKey = new JCERSAPublicKey(
    new RSAKeyParameters(false, modulus, exponent));

See the class definition.

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