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I have a tale of 6 classes: 3 managed and 3 native.

The 3 managed classes are ManagedChildA, ManagedChildB and ManagedParent.

ManagedChildA, ManagedChildB both inherit from ManagedParentA.

The 3 nativeclasses are NativeChildA, NativeChildB and NativeParent.

NativeChildA, NativeChildB both inherit from NativeParentA.

Moreover, ManagedChildA wraps NativeChildB, ManagedChildB wraps ManagedChildB and ManagedParentA wraps NativeParentA.

Now here the tale gows awry:

ManagedParentA has a method called ManagedExecute() that wraps NativeParentA's NativeExecute(). When this method is called, everything runs smoothly.

NativeChildB, ManagedChildB override ManagedExecute() to provide their own implementations, with ManagedChildA::ManagedExecute() wrapping NativeChildA::NativeExecute() and ManagedChildB::ManagedExecute() wrapping NativeChildB::NativeExecute().

When for example the overriden ManagedExecute() of ManagedChildA is called, NativeChildA::NativeExecute() gets called albeit with a System.AccessViolation error. That is, the pointer to the original parent of NativeChildA cannot be located.

I guess the pointer has been moved from its original address. I read on the internet, I have to pin pointers to prevent the Garbage Collector (GC) from moving memory around but I don't know what to pin, since the exception gets thrown at the native level. Any useful hints?

Example:

//C++ -native classes
class NativeFoo
{
  public:
  NativeFoo(): tested(true){}
  virtual void execute()
  {
     std::cout << "Native Foo" << std::endl;
  }

  protected:
  bool tested;

 };


 class NativeBarA :NativeFoo
 {
  public:
  NativeBarA(): NativeFoo(){}
  void execute()
  {
     std::cout << "Native Bar A" << std::endl;
  }
 };

 class NativeBarB : public NativeFoo
 {
  public:
  NativeBarB() :NativeFoo(){}
  void execute()
  {
     std::cout << "Native Bar B" << std::endl;
  }
 };

//CLI interface
 public interface class IExecutable
 {
     public:
       Execute();
 }

//C++-CLI classes 
public ref class ManagedFoo: public IExecutable
{

  private:
  NativeFoo* impl;

  public:

 ManagedFoo(): impl(NULL)
 {
  impl = new NativeFoo();
 }

 void __clrcall Execute()
 {
  impl->execute(); 
 }
};

public ref class ManagedBarA: public ManagedFoo
{

  private:
  NativeBarA* impl;

  public:

 ManagedBarA(): ManagedFoo(), impl(NULL)
 {
  impl = new NativeBarA();
 }

 void __clrcall Execute() override
 {
  impl->execute(); 
 }
};

public ref class ManagedBarB: public ManagedFoo
{

  private:
  NativeBarB* impl;

  public:

 ManagedBarB(): ManagedFoo(), impl(NULL)
 {
  impl = new NativeBarB();
 }

 void __clrcall Execute() override
 {
  impl->execute(); 
 }
};


//Calling code
[STAThread]
static void Main()
{
   ManagedFoo^ mfoo = gcnew ManagedFoo();
   ManagedBarA  mbarA = gcnew ManagedBarA();
   ManagedBarB  mbarB = gcnew ManagedBarB();
   mfoo->Execute(); //OK
   mbarA->Execute(); //Error. Debugger sees value of tested as false
   mBarB->Execute(); //Error
}
share|improve this question
    
Pointers to native classes aren't moved, that's not the problem. Could you show us short code that exhibits this problem? –  svick Oct 9 '11 at 14:11
    
Hiding base class member variables by adding a member variable with the same name in the derived class is a TERRIBLE idea. What you probably want is a getter function that casts the base class member to the derived type. –  Ben Voigt Oct 10 '11 at 0:18
    
True Ben, but what if I want to work only through interfaces? That is, instead of: mbarA->Execute(), I want to use iexec->Execute(), where iexec is an instance variable of any class implementing IExecutable? –  reexmonkey Oct 13 '11 at 12:56

1 Answer 1

The snippet is very low quality, it is littered with uncompilable code. No repro once I fixed all the mistakes.

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
using namespace System;

//C++ -native classes
class NativeFoo
{
public:
    NativeFoo(): tested(true){}
    virtual void execute()
    {
        std::cout << "Native Foo" << std::endl;
    }

protected:
    bool tested;

};


class NativeBarA :NativeFoo
{
public:
    NativeBarA(): NativeFoo(){}
    void execute()
    {
        std::cout << "Native Bar A" << std::endl;
    }
};

class NativeBarB : public NativeFoo
{
public:
    NativeBarB() :NativeFoo(){}
    void execute()
    {
        std::cout << "Native Bar B" << std::endl;
    }
};

//CLI interface
public interface class IExecutable
{
public:
    void Execute();
};

//C++-CLI classes 
public ref class ManagedFoo: public IExecutable
{

private:
    NativeFoo* impl;

public:

    ManagedFoo(): impl(NULL)
    {
        impl = new NativeFoo();
    }

    virtual void Execute()
    {
        impl->execute(); 
    }
};

public ref class ManagedBarA: public ManagedFoo
{

private:
    NativeBarA* impl;

public:

    ManagedBarA(): ManagedFoo(), impl(NULL)
    {
        impl = new NativeBarA();
    }

    virtual void __clrcall Execute() override
    {
        impl->execute(); 
    }
};

public ref class ManagedBarB: public ManagedFoo
{

private:
    NativeBarB* impl;

public:

    ManagedBarB(): ManagedFoo(), impl(NULL)
    {
        impl = new NativeBarB();
    }

    virtual void __clrcall Execute() override
    {
        impl->execute(); 
    }
};


//Calling code
[STAThread]
int main(array<System::String ^> ^args)
{
    ManagedFoo^ mfoo = gcnew ManagedFoo();
    ManagedBarA^  mbarA = gcnew ManagedBarA();
    ManagedBarB^  mbarB = gcnew ManagedBarB();
    mfoo->Execute(); //OK
    mbarA->Execute(); //Fine
    mbarB->Execute(); //Fine
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the correction.... although the code works it doesn't solve my problem because the above snippet is all in one assembly. Try building 3 dll files: the main application running in one, then the other dll used for the managed classes while the last dll should hold the native classes. You would notice a weird behavior that derived native classes lose their inherited members when their overridden method is called. –  reexmonkey Oct 9 '11 at 19:36
1  
Hmm, so the code snippet wasn't just filled with errors, it didn't even demonstrate the problem? I can only guess you forgot to use #pragma managed before #including the header files. You have to learn how to ask better questions. Good luck with it. –  Hans Passant Oct 9 '11 at 20:57
    
c'mon hans... don't get picky about the #pragma managed ... not necessary in all cases... and as concerns my snippet, i wasn't writing for a test code.. it was simply to demonstrate the nature of the problem.... and of course problem definitions get clearer after some tests. Sometimes things are not what they appear to be! –  reexmonkey Oct 13 '11 at 12:47

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