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I've got the following markup:

<div class="display-none" id="team_[NEXT-NUMBER-BY-PHP]">
<div id="ajax-json-loading"></div><div id="ajax-json-response"></div>
<table cellspacing="5">
 <tr>
  <td valign="top" style="width: 100px;">
   <b>SOMETHING</b>
  </td>
  <td id="team-leader-area">
   <div id="team-leader-id"><a href="javascript:void(0)"><?php echo $value['leader']; ?></a></div>
   <div id="team-leader-modify"><a href="javascript:void(0)" onClick="changeAdmin(this.offsetParent)">Modify</a></div>
  </td>
 </tr>
 <tr>
  <td valign="top" style="width: 100px;">
   <b>SOMETHING ELSE:</b>
  </td>
  <td>
   <?php echo $value['p_address']; ?>
  </td>
 </tr>
</table>
</div>
<div class="display-none" id="team_[NEXT-NUMBER-BY-PHP]">
...

Which repeats. As you see, I have the JS function in the #team-leader-modify div, and I have to change the context of #team-leader-id.

Is it possible with using "parent" controls? If yes, how? If no, what's the easiest way?

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
1  
Unless I've misunderstood your example, you're breaking the rule that ID attributes must be unique throughout the document. –  lonesomeday Oct 9 '11 at 14:34
    
Oh, mean the IDs as classes. –  Skylineman Oct 9 '11 at 14:37
    
So the goal is that to I can modify the divs without making the IDs as "team-leader-id-1 | team-leader-id-2" and so and so. –  Skylineman Oct 9 '11 at 14:38
1  
If you're using jQuery, you should use jQuery event handlers, not inline event handlers like onclick="dostuff()". –  Jared Farrish Oct 9 '11 at 14:39
2  
Believe me, you're better off not using inline handlers. You can do the same thing much more effectively with a jQuery click handler, and you don't have to worry about passing a parent reference to a function from it. –  Jared Farrish Oct 9 '11 at 14:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Given that [NEXT-NUMBER-BY-PHP] = 100 for the "current" iteration:

<div class="display-none team_data" id="team_100">
 <div class="ajax-json-loading"></div>
 <div class="ajax-json-response"></div>
 <table cellspacing="5">
  <tr>
   <td valign="top" style="width: 100px;">
    <b>SOMETHING</b>
   </td>
   <td class="team-leader-area">
    <div class="team-leader-id">
     <a><?php echo $value['leader']; ?></a>
    </div>
    <div class="team-leader-modify">
     <a>Modify</a>
    </div>
   </td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
   <td valign="top" style="width: 100px;">
    <b>SOMETHING ELSE:</b>
   </td>
   <td>
    <?php echo $value['p_address']; ?>
   </td>
  </tr>
 </table>
</div>

Then you can use jQuery click handler's:

$(document).ready(function(){
    $('.team-leader-modify a').click(function(){
        changeAdmin($(this).parent());
    });
});

Alternatively, if you need the current team's id, you could:

$(document).ready(function(){
    $('.team-leader-modify a').click(function(){
        changeAdmin($(this).parents('.team_data')[0].id);
    });
});

Which will give you the id in the containing div.

share|improve this answer
    
Hm, I'll try this too. –  Skylineman Oct 9 '11 at 15:00
1  
You're not really using the power and grace of CSS selectors or jQuery effectively. This way you group each by the containing "team" div, and "class[ify]" each meaningful part within it so you can manipulate it. Also, I forgot to remove the inline onclick, so see following my last edit. –  Jared Farrish Oct 9 '11 at 15:02
    
And to be honest, I believe you could do $('.team-leader-modify a').click... instead. –  Jared Farrish Oct 9 '11 at 15:04
    
Thank you so much. The reason is that, I'm not the best in JS, so I don't understand everything. But thanks for you, I've started to change with yours. –  Skylineman Oct 9 '11 at 15:06
    
You're a lot luckier than I am; I learned back in the day. jQuery is so much nicer and effective to use for many things. –  Jared Farrish Oct 9 '11 at 15:08

Maybe try:

$('#team-leader-modify').closest('td').find('div#team-leader-id')

But I don't know if that's too specific. You could do:

$('#team-leader-modify').closest('td').find('div:first-child')

Which is a little more flexible perhaps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Yours working too! –  Skylineman Oct 9 '11 at 14:57

First off, take note of the comments to your answer, since there are some serious shortcomings in your code.

Anyway, if 'changeAdmin' fires from within 'div#team-leader-modify', you can access '#team-leader-id' with this:

 $('#team-leader-modify').parent('td').find('#team-leader-id')

Good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much! –  Skylineman Oct 9 '11 at 14:57
1  
The only problem is that this id attribute is used serially through the page (200-300 times, according to the OP's comment). At least, change it to a class. At least. :) –  Jared Farrish Oct 9 '11 at 14:58
    
Once again, pay attention to Jared's comments! id's are supposed to be unique. Using multiple elements with the same id can (and most propably will) bite you in the butt when you least expect it :-) –  Kostas Maragos Oct 9 '11 at 16:42

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