Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I was pointed to the 'safe bool idiom', and after trying to decipher what is going on (the explanation supplied on the site was not sufficient enough to grant me understanding of why it works), I decided to try to take the following code apart and make an attempt at simplifying it as much as possible. The site supplied code below:

class Testable {
    bool ok_;
    typedef void (Testable::*bool_type)() const;
    void this_type_does_not_support_comparisons() const {}
  public:
    explicit Testable(bool b=true):ok_(b) {}

    operator bool_type() const {
      return ok_==true ? 
        &Testable::this_type_does_not_support_comparisons : 0;
    }
  };

I decided to analyse the key basis of 'bool_type' given this seems to be what it's centred on. Given the following line:

typedef void (Testable::*bool_type)() const;

One can (not so easily, due to bracketing) deduce it's a typedef of a type of 'void Testable::*', of which bool_type represents. This can be further demonstrated by making the following modifications and function calls:

class Testable {
    bool ok_;
    typedef void (Testable::*bool_type)() const;
    void this_type_does_not_support_comparisons() const {}
  public:
    explicit Testable(bool b=true):ok_(b) {}

    bool_type Test; //Added this

    operator bool_type() const {
      return ok_==true ?
        &Testable::this_type_does_not_support_comparisons : 0;
    }
  };

int main()
{
    Testable Test;
    int A = Test.Test; //Compiler will give a conversion error, telling us what type .Test is in the process
}

It allows us to see what type bool_type is:

error: cannot convert 'void (Testable::*)()const' to 'int' in initialization

Which shows it is indeed a type of 'void (Testable::*)'.

The issues crops up here:

If we modify the following function:

    operator bool_type() const {
      return ok_==true ? 
        &Testable::this_type_does_not_support_comparisons : 0;
    }

And turn it into:

    operator void Testable::* () const //Same as bool_type, right? 
    {
      return ok_==true ? 
        &Testable::this_type_does_not_support_comparisons : 0;
    }

It generates the following complaints:

error: expected identifier before '*' token
error: '< invalid operator >' declared as function returning a function

My questions are thus:

Why is it generating those complaints if 'void (Testable::*) is indeed the typedef for bool_type?

And

What is going on here?

share|improve this question
1  
Why does a person put one question in the title, and then a quite different one in the text? Not to mention two such very different questions? – Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 9 '11 at 15:15
    
What's the question? bool_type is a pointer-to-member-function, pointing to a function of type void Testable::some_function() const. There's no confusion "due to bracketing" (although the C++ declaration syntax is not exactly the epitome of beauty). – Kerrek SB Oct 9 '11 at 15:16
    
I never said the word confusion, I just said it wasn't easy to deduce (Testable::*bool_type) would, on first glance, appear to be a pointer to a variable called bool_type. Except it's not, given the typedef implies the last word used is typedef after everything preceeding it. Even though it's bracketed (which runs contrary to precedence). – SSight3 Oct 9 '11 at 15:22
    
@Alf Point is, why is the replacement for bool_type not working? And also, I don't see how it's different from the title (What is going on here? = How does the safe bool idiom work?; Why is it generating those complaints = how does the bool_type work). I just think you're being pedantic. – SSight3 Oct 9 '11 at 15:24
    
@SSight3: the title question is about an anti-pattern (using evil implicit conversions while using rube goldberg like technique to avoid one particular pitfall), while the questions in the text are concerned with C++ syntax only. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 9 '11 at 16:25
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your reasoning goes wrong about here

operator void Testable::* () const //Same as bool_type, right? 

This isn't correct. The type of bool_type is, as the compiler tells us in the error message:

'void (Testable::*)()const'

So, to replace it in the operator, you would need something like

operator (void (Testable::*)() const) () const

if that is ever possible! See why even the ugly typedef is an improvement?

In C++11 we also have the new construct explicit operator bool() to save us from this ugliness.

share|improve this answer
    
Let me guess, explicit makes it only work for bools? Clever idea. And thank you for actually answering the question. – SSight3 Oct 9 '11 at 17:32
    
s/answering the question/making a really good guess at what the question was/ – Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 9 '11 at 18:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.