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I did a git commit -m "message" like this

>git commit -m "save arezzo files"
# On branch master
# Changes not staged for commit:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#       modified:   arezzo.txt
#       modified:   arezzo.jsp
#
no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")

but afterwards, when I do git status it shows the same modified files:

>git status
# On branch master
# Changes not staged for commit:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#       modified:   arezzo.txt
#       modified:   arezzo.jsp
#
no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")

What am I doing wrong?

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9  
Use git commit -am "save arezzo files" to automatically add all changes (w.r.t. .gitignore). You may want to add only specific files/dirs: git add file.src –  mbx Oct 9 '11 at 15:21
    

8 Answers 8

up vote 144 down vote accepted

As the message says:

no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")

Git has a "staging area" where files need to be added before being committed, you can read an explanation of it here.


For your specific example, you can use:

git commit -am "save arezzo files"

(note the extra a in the flags, can also be written as git commit -a -m "message" - both do the same thing)

Alternatively, if you want to be more selective about what you add to the commit, you use the git add command to add the appropriate files to the staging area, and git status to preview what is about to be added (remembering to pay attention to the wording used).

You can also find general documentation and tutorials for how to use git on the git documentation page which will give more detail about the concept of staging/adding files.


One other thing worth knowing about is interactive adding - this allows you to add parts of a file to the staging area, so if you've made three distinct code changes (for related but different functionality), you can use interactive mode to split the changes and add/commit each part in turn. Having smaller specific commits like this can be helpful.

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Very helpful explanation. Thank you. –  arezzo Oct 9 '11 at 15:39
    
@PeterBoughton did you mean "interactive adding" instead of "interacting adding"? –  djb Aug 7 '12 at 15:54
1  
Nah, I meant interactual adding. –  Peter Boughton Aug 7 '12 at 21:42
    
(thanks, shame it took 10 months for anyone to spot) –  Peter Boughton Aug 7 '12 at 21:42
    
Local repository is a kind of a staging area itself before pushing code to remote repository. Why add a yet another "layer" before commiting changes, isn't it a bit overcomplicated? I'm new to git but I imagine 99,99% developers always use commit -am because the changes don't go outside their local environment anyway. –  PawelRoman Aug 4 '14 at 14:31

You didn't add the changes. Either specifically add them via

git add filename1 filename2

or add all changes (from root path of the project)

git add .

or use the shorthand -a while commiting:

git commit -a -m "message".
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In addition, I strongly urge users to use interactive adding. Especially when you're trying to make nice small commits that are easily reversible. –  jer Oct 9 '11 at 15:28

you should do

git commit . -m "save arezzo files"
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+1 You're a life saver! –  Miguel Dec 1 '12 at 0:43

I copied a small sub project I had that was under git source into another project and forgot to delete the .git folder. When I went to commit got the same message as above and couldn't clear it until I deleted the .git folder. Bit silly, but worth checking you don't have a .git folder under the folder that doesn't commit.

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You could have done a:

git add -u -n

To check which files you modified and are going to be added (dry run: -n option), and then

git add -u

To add just modified files

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Maybe an obvious thing but...

If you have problem with the index, use the
git gui
You get a very good view how the index (staging area) actually works.

Another source of info that helped me understand the index was Scott Chacons "Getting Git" page 259 and forward.

I started off using the command line because most documentation only shown that...

I think the git gui and gitk actually make me work faster and I got rid of bad habits like "git pull" for example... Now I always fetch first... see what the new changes really are before I merge.

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I find this problem appearing when I've done a git add . in a subdirectory below where my .gitignore file lives (the home directory of my repository, so to speak). Try changing directories to your uppermost directory and running git add . followed by git commit -m "my commit message".

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I had an issue where I was doing commit --amend even after issuing a git add . and it still wasn't working. Turns out I made some .vimrc customizations and my editor wasn't working correctly. Fixing these errors so that vim returns the correct code resolved the issue.

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