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SQL: Join vs. subquery

Is there anything that we can do with joins but not with subqueries or vice-versa?

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marked as duplicate by Jeff Atwood Oct 10 '11 at 10:24

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That kind of question shouldn't be here. Doesn't make a lot of sense to begin with. –  Erwin Brandstetter Oct 9 '11 at 18:30
    
What are the similarities? :-) –  DavidEG Oct 9 '11 at 18:30

3 Answers 3

In most cases with enterprise applications, it's not just a question of IF something can be done, but HOW it is done. Generally speaking, Joins are faster and less expensive than subqueries. Ton of other posts on this subject on SO. Here's one: SQL: Join vs. subquery

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"Generally speaking, Joins are faster and less expensive" -- But is there any value in generalizing? –  onedaywhen Oct 10 '11 at 7:33
    
Is there any way to write correlated subqueries in oracle using join? –  Gautam Bhalla Oct 16 '11 at 19:37

Other than the obvious (return columns from the joined table), anything you can do with one, you can do with the other. The query optimizer will decide how to implement them. You could verify this by looking at some query plans.

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You can indeed return columns from the 'joined' table using subqueries in the SELECT clause e.g. this join SELECT S.SNAME, SP.PNO FROM S INNER JOIN SP ON SP.SNO = S.SNO; can be rewritten using a subquery like this SELECT SP.PNO, (SELECT SNAME FROM S WHERE SP.SNO = S.SNO) FROM SP; –  onedaywhen Oct 10 '11 at 7:38
    
You can return A column from a subquery, but not more than one (well, you can add them together, and then reyun that as your single column). –  jmoreno Oct 10 '11 at 8:15
    
You would use one subquery per 'joined' column projected e.g. exended the above to include CITY: SELECT SP.PNO, (SELECT S.SNAME FROM S WHERE SP.SNO = S.SNO) AS SNAME, (SELECT S.CITY FROM S WHERE SP.SNO = S.SNO) AS CITY FROM SP; –  onedaywhen Oct 10 '11 at 10:02
    
Is there any way to write correlated subqueries in oracle using join? –  Gautam Bhalla Oct 16 '11 at 19:37

Frankly, I can't think of a case where one thing can't be achieved from either method (subquery or join).

To me it's more about readability and performance. For example, a subquery might be slower whereas a join might take advantage of certain indexes. At least from the DBMS standpoint, I would imagine, should be easier to optimize a join when analyzing the expression.

Consider the case of several joins expressed as subqueries, for example. To most people, seeing the statement expressed as a Left, Right or Inner join would make it easier to understand and maintain. I even avoid using implicit joins since they hide the intent. In other words, I prefer to express a join as from table a inner join table b on a.id=b.id vs from table a, table b where a.id=b.id. Implementing joins as subqueries make it even less readable, IMO.

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"To most people, seeing the statement expressed as a Left, Right or Inner join would make it easier to understand and maintain" -- I'm not sure that is correct for most, certainly not for me e.g. I much prefer to write a semijoin using EXISTS (subquery) rather than a join, ditto semi difference and I note many people on SO like to use IN (subquery). –  onedaywhen Oct 10 '11 at 7:42
    
Is there any way to write correlated subqueries in oracle using join? –  Gautam Bhalla Oct 16 '11 at 19:38

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