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I was given a data set that is essentially an image, however each pixel in the image is represented as a value from -1 to 1 inclusive. I am writing an application that needs to take these -1 to 1 grayscale values and map them to the associated RGB value for the MATLAB "Jet" color scale (red-green-blue color gradient).

I am curious if anyone knows how to take a linear value (like -1 to 1) and map it to this scale. Note that I am not actually using MATLAB for this (nor can I), I just need to take the grayscale value and put it on the Jet gradient.

Thanks, Adam

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So you want to end up with a B&W image encoded with a color format? – Pubby Oct 9 '11 at 20:45
1  
What do the values mean? For example, is -1 pure black? – Jim Rhodes Oct 9 '11 at 20:48
    
I have a C++ class that converts from a wavelength (in nanometers) to RGB. Is this what you want ? (of course, you would use -1=380nm=violet and 1=780nm=red to cover the whole scale). It seems to me that the 'jet' color scale is more about the visible spectrum than about Red-Green-Blue. Anyway I can post the code if it can help. – Tibo Oct 9 '11 at 20:49
    
The data itself is a 530x530 covariance matrix. Each value of the matrix is represented from -1 to 1 and is traditionally colored with a gradient from dark red (1) to green-sh (0) to dark blue (-1). Here is a link that may help describe the gradient: blogs.mathworks.com/images/loren/73/colormapManip_14.png The data is often used in MATLAB and it can automatically apply this single value to the gradient. However, I need to use it in my real-time C++ graphics application while still preserving the proper color scheme. – Adam Shook Oct 9 '11 at 20:56
    
Sounds like the most straightforward method would be to calculate hue (in degrees) as something like hue = 120 - 120 * data (to give you a range of 240 = blue to 0 = red) and then assume full saturation and value and convert to RGB. Unless you want to check if (data < 0) then RGB is over one range else if (data > 0) then RGB is over another range. – tinman Oct 9 '11 at 21:19
up vote 15 down vote accepted

I hope this is what you're looking for:

double interpolate( double val, double y0, double x0, double y1, double x1 ) {
  return (val-x0)*(y1-y0)/(x1-x0) + y0;
}
double blue( double grayscale ) {
  if ( grayscale < -0.33 ) return 1.0;
  else if ( grayscale < 0.33 ) return interpolate( grayscale, 1.0, -0.33, 0.0, 0.33 );
  else return 0.0;
}
double green( double grayscale ) {
  if ( grayscale < -1.0 ) return 0.0; // unexpected grayscale value
  if  ( grayscale < -0.33 ) return interpolate( grayscale, 0.0, -1.0, 1.0, -0.33 );
  else if ( grayscale < 0.33 ) return 1.0;
  else if ( grayscale <= 1.0 ) return interpolate( grayscale, 1.0, 0.33, 0.0, 1.0 );
  else return 1.0; // unexpected grayscale value
}
double red( double grayscale ) {
  if ( grayscale < -0.33 ) return 0.0;
  else if ( grayscale < 0.33 ) return interpolate( grayscale, 0.0, -0.33, 1.0, 0.33 );
  else return 1.0;
}

I'm not sure if this scale is 100% identical the image you linked but it should looks very similar.

UPDATE I've rewrite code according to description of MatLab's Jet palette found here

double interpolate( double val, double y0, double x0, double y1, double x1 ) {
    return (val-x0)*(y1-y0)/(x1-x0) + y0;
}

double base( double val ) {
    if ( val <= -0.75 ) return 0;
    else if ( val <= -0.25 ) return interpolate( val, 0.0, -0.75, 1.0, -0.25 );
    else if ( val <= 0.25 ) return 1.0;
    else if ( val <= 0.75 ) return interpolate( val, 1.0, 0.25, 0.0, 0.75 );
    else return 0.0;
}

double red( double gray ) {
    return base( gray - 0.5 );
}
double green( double gray ) {
    return base( gray );
}
double blue( double gray ) {
    return base( gray + 0.5 );
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is fairly close but not 100%. It will work for the time being. I may just have to sample a texture to get the exact values... Thank you! – Adam Shook Oct 9 '11 at 21:39
1  
I've found some info about MatLab's Jet palette: bugs.launchpad.net/inkscape/+bug/236508 – Ilya Denisov Oct 11 '11 at 7:52
    
Thank you very much for your efforts. It is well appreciated. – ypnos Dec 23 '11 at 17:41
    
Thank you for saving my days :) – Bossliaw Jun 14 '12 at 14:33

Consider the following function (written by Paul Bourke):

/*
   Return a RGB colour value given a scalar v in the range [vmin,vmax]
   In this case each colour component ranges from 0 (no contribution) to
   1 (fully saturated), modifications for other ranges is trivial.
   The colour is clipped at the end of the scales if v is outside
   the range [vmin,vmax]
*/

typedef struct {
    double r,g,b;
} COLOUR;

COLOUR GetColour(double v,double vmin,double vmax)
{
   COLOUR c = {1.0,1.0,1.0}; // white
   double dv;

   if (v < vmin)
      v = vmin;
   if (v > vmax)
      v = vmax;
   dv = vmax - vmin;

   if (v < (vmin + 0.25 * dv)) {
      c.r = 0;
      c.g = 4 * (v - vmin) / dv;
   } else if (v < (vmin + 0.5 * dv)) {
      c.r = 0;
      c.b = 1 + 4 * (vmin + 0.25 * dv - v) / dv;
   } else if (v < (vmin + 0.75 * dv)) {
      c.r = 4 * (v - vmin - 0.5 * dv) / dv;
      c.b = 0;
   } else {
      c.g = 1 + 4 * (vmin + 0.75 * dv - v) / dv;
      c.b = 0;
   }

   return(c);
}

Which, in your case, you would use it to map values in the range [-1,1] to colors as (it is straightforward to translate it from C code to a MATLAB function):

c = GetColour(v,-1.0,1.0);

This produces to the following "hot-to-cold" color ramp:

color_ramp

It basically represents a walk on the edges of the RGB color cube from blue to red (passing by cyan, green, yellow), and interpolating the values along this path.

color_cube


Note this is slightly different from the "Jet" colormap used in MATLAB, which as far as I can tell, goes through the following path:

#00007F: dark blue
#0000FF: blue
#007FFF: azure
#00FFFF: cyan
#7FFF7F: light green
#FFFF00: yellow
#FF7F00: orange
#FF0000: red
#7F0000: dark red

Here is a comparison I did in MATLAB:

%# values
num = 64;
v = linspace(-1,1,num);

%# colormaps
clr1 = jet(num);
clr2 = zeros(num,3);
for i=1:num
    clr2(i,:) = GetColour(v(i), v(1), v(end));
end

Then we plot both using:

figure
subplot(4,1,1), imagesc(v), colormap(clr), axis off
subplot(4,1,2:4), h = plot(v,clr); axis tight
set(h, {'Color'},{'r';'g';'b'}, 'LineWidth',3)

jet hot_to_cold

Now you can modify the C code above, and use the suggested stop points to achieve something similar to jet colormap (they all use linear interpolation over the R,G,B channels as you can see from the above plots)...

share|improve this answer
4  
+1 This should be the answer selected – Tae-Sung Shin Dec 5 '12 at 17:41
4  
+1 Excellent explanation – Jaime Ivan Cervantes Sep 16 '13 at 8:20
    
Wonderful! It fits my needs perfectly! Why processing doesn't come with something like this I will never understand..... – Mizmor Oct 31 '13 at 14:06
    
The picture of the cube made it crystal clear to me. Thanks. – pelesl Jun 22 '14 at 19:47

Seems like you have hue values of an HSL system and the saturation and lightness are implicit. Search for HSL to RGB conversion on the internet and you will find a lot of explanations, code etc. (Here is one link)

In your particular case, though, let's assume you are defaulting all color saturations to 1 and lightness to 0.5. Here is the formula you can use to get the RGB values:

Imagine for every pixel, you have h the value you read from your data.

hue = (h+1.0)/2;  // This is to make it in range [0, 1]
temp[3] = {hue+1.0/3, hue, hue-1.0/3};
if (temp[0] > 1.0)
    temp[0] -= 1.0;
if (temp[2] < 0.0)
    temp[2] += 1.0;

float RGB[3];
for (int i = 0; i < 3; ++i)
{
    if (temp[i]*6.0 < 1.0)
        RGB[i] = 6.0f*temp[i];
    else if (temp[i]*2.0 < 1.0)
        RGB[i] = 1;
    else if (temp[i]*3.0 < 2.0)
        RGB[i] = ((2.0/3.0)-temp[i])*6.0f;
    else
        RGB[i] = 0;
}

And there you have the RGB values in RGB all in the range [0, 1]. Note that the original conversion is more complex, I simplified it based on values of saturation=1 and lightness=0.5

Why this formula? See this wikipedia entry

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This probably isn't exactly the same, but it may be close enough for your needs:

if (-0.75 > value) {
    blue = 1.75 + value;
} else if (0.25 > value) {
    blue = 0.25 - value;
} else {
    blue = 0;
}

if ( -0.5 > value) {
    green = 0;
} else if (0.5 > value) {
    green = 1 - 2*abs(value);
} else {
    green = 0;
}

if ( -0.25 > value) {
    red = 0;
} else if (0.75 > value) {
    red = 0.25 + value;
} else {
    red = 1.75 - value;
}
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