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From Javadoc of ArrayBlockingQueue ArrayBlockingQueue:

add

public boolean add(E e)

Inserts the specified element at the tail of this queue if it is possible 
to do so immediately without exceeding the queue's capacity, returning true 
upon success and throwing an IllegalStateException if this queue is full.

I always interpretted this statement (the part if it is possible to do so immediattely) as follows:

If the queue has free capacity, then the insert will succeed. If there is no empty space then it will not succeed.

But my understanding was wrong here.

In a simple case that I decided to use an ArrayBlockingQueue for e.g. 20 elements (small queue) and having one thread doing:

queue.take()

the other thread did not add an element to the queue via the add method despite the queue was almost empty.

I verified it also via debugging.

Once I replaced the call of queue.add(element) to queue.put(element) the element was indeed added to the queue.

So what is so different in these to methods?

For what other reason (besides capacity) could the addition not happen?


UPDATE:

public class ConnectionListener implements Observer {

  public static BlockingQueue<ConnectionObject> queueConnections = new   ArrayBlockingQueue<ConnectionObject>(10);

  @Override
  public void update(Observable arg0, Object arg1) {
      ConnectionObject con = ((ConnectionObject)arg1);
      queueConnections.add(con);
  }

}  

ConnectionObject is just a holder for String values.

public class ConnectionObject {
  private String user;  
  private String ip;
   //etc  
}

And the consumer:

public class ConnectionTreeUpdater extends Thread {  
  @Override
  public void run() {
    while(true){  
    try {  
    final ConnectionObject con = ConnectionListener.queueConnections.take();

If I use add no exception is thrown but element does not get added to the queue.

Just a thought: perhaps since the consumer is "waiting" on the queue, if for some internal housekeeping the element can not be added it will not be added and no exception is thrown.Could that be the case.

Otherwise I can not understand why there is no exception and with put the code works.

Are put and add meant to be used differently?

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I suspect you were catching and ignoring the exception being thrown by add() but without seeing your code that's just a guess. You need to post a small code example demonstrating the problem you are having. –  Brian Roach Oct 9 '11 at 21:34
    
Actually there was no exception in add. I just did queue.add and the code returned immediatelly without adding the element and no exception –  Cratylus Oct 9 '11 at 21:40
    
@user384706: Please can we see a complete and reproducible test case that demonstrates this behaviour (add() not throwing an exception but also not adding the element to the queue). –  NPE Oct 9 '11 at 21:42
1  
No, it didn't. It either added it to the queue, or it threw an exception. Those are the only two possible outcomes. –  Brian Roach Oct 9 '11 at 21:42
    
@Brian:Updated post with some code –  Cratylus Oct 9 '11 at 21:47
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's quite simple really:

  • if the queue is not full, both methods succeed;
  • if the queue is full, add() fails with an exception whereas put() blocks.

I think the documentation is pretty clear on the above. If you don't agree, and would like a second opinion, you could examine the source code for ArrayBlockingQueue:

public boolean add(E e) {
    if (offer(e))
        return true;
    else
        throw new IllegalStateException("Queue full");
}

public boolean offer(E e) {
    if (e == null) throw new NullPointerException();
    final ReentrantLock lock = this.lock;
    lock.lock();
    try {
        if (count == items.length)
            return false;
        else {
            insert(e);
            return true;
        }
    } finally {
        lock.unlock();
    }
}

public void put(E e) throws InterruptedException {
    if (e == null) throw new NullPointerException();
    final E[] items = this.items;
    final ReentrantLock lock = this.lock;
    lock.lockInterruptibly();
    try {
        try {
            while (count == items.length)
                notFull.await();
        } catch (InterruptedException ie) {
            notFull.signal(); // propagate to non-interrupted thread
            throw ie;
        }
        insert(e);
    } finally {
        lock.unlock();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
If you find the documentation ambiguous, you can verify this by looking at the source code - Well there's a difference between an implementation detail and documentation, so I'm not really happy with that advice in general. If the documentation is unclear (though I think it's quite clear in this case), opening a bug is more sensible I think (haven't done that for Java, but more than once for msdn [well the win32 api doc is a mess though ;-)]) –  Voo Oct 9 '11 at 21:49
    
@Voo: I see your point. However, for a meaningful bug report there has to be a bug (or a reasonable belief that there is a bug). In this case both the documentation and the code very clearly state the same thing (to my eyes anyway). –  NPE Oct 9 '11 at 21:51
    
I agree that in this case the documentation is clear enough (well and the code obviously does the right thingTM). Just if the documentation was really unclear, just looking at the implementation and assuming that it could never change would be a bad idea. Creating a bug for the documentation to see if that was just an honest oversight or left undefined for good reason is imo the better course of action (well first googling around obviously ;) ) –  Voo Oct 9 '11 at 22:01
    
@Voo - While I agree with you on some level, if you suspect there's a bug you write a repeatable test case to demonstrate it and then file the report. The OP seems unable to provide this after being asked, so at this point telling them to look at the source isn't a terrible suggestion. Suspecting there's a bug in stable, old code that is used by millions of developers every day is simply poor logic and the hallmark of a bad engineer. Jeff (co founder of SO) outlines this in: codinghorror.com/blog/2008/03/… –  Brian Roach Oct 9 '11 at 22:44
    
@BrianRoach I'm nowhere saying that there's a bug in there, just that's it no good idea to look at the implementation if the documentation doesn't specify something or is unclear. So answering a question about the behavior of a function with "Looking at the src code it does the following" can lead to interesting problems down the road. Example? The C# string hash function is nowhere documented and DID actually change through versions, which lead to interesting problems down the road. Edit: The OP changed his post quite a bit since this here was written so the context changed a bit. –  Voo Oct 9 '11 at 23:01
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One of the more important parts of debugging a problem is writing a test case to make sure what you think is happening is indeed happening. This either proves or disproves your theory.

The test case below shows that the methods you are using behave exactly as the documentation (which you quote) states:

public static void main(String[] args) {

    final ArrayBlockingQueue<Integer> myQueue =
            new ArrayBlockingQueue<Integer>(10);


    Thread t1 = new Thread(new Runnable() {

        public void run()
        {
            int i = 0;
            while (true)
            {
               try
                {
                    myQueue.add(i);
                    System.out.println("Added to queue! value: " + 
                                        i + 
                                        " size: " + myQueue.size());
                    i++;
                }
                catch (Exception e)
                {
                    System.out.println("add() threw exception, size: " +
                                        myQueue.size());
                    try
                    {
                        Thread.sleep(1000);
                    }
                    catch (InterruptedException ex)
                    {
                        Logger.getLogger(Main.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, 
                                                                   null, ex);
                    }
                }
            }
        }

    });

    Thread t2 = new Thread(new Runnable() {

        public void run()
        {
            while (true)
            {
                try
                {
                    Integer i = myQueue.take();
                    System.out.println("Took a off the queue! value: " + 
                                        i + 
                                       " size: " + myQueue.size());
                    Thread.sleep(100);
                }
                catch (InterruptedException ex)
                {
                    Logger.getLogger(Main.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, 
                                                               null, ex);
                }
            }
        }
    });

    t1.start();
    t2.start();

}
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