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I have two files, index.php and a callback.php. Index.php is used to display data on the website. The callback.php is a script that acts like a listener. The callback.php is called by a server and the $update variable in callback.php is updated by the server in real time. I want to see the contents of $update variable every time it updates.

Callback.php:

    if ($method == 'GET' && $_GET['hub_mode'] == 'subscribe' &&
        $_GET['hub_verify_token'] == VERIFY_TOKEN) {
      echo $_GET['hub_challenge'];

    } else if ($method == 'POST') {
       $updates = json_decode(file_get_contents("php://input"), true);
       //I want to see the content of $updates
       // resend the push notification again.
        error_log('updates = ' . print_r($updates, true));
     }

How can i do this? Please let me know. I would appreciate if you have some sample code i could start with.

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1 Answer 1

The technique I believe you are describing is called long-polling.

Basically, the client sends an ajax request to the server and sits there waiting for a response. Upon some event (this is where SSJS like Node comes in really handy), the server sends the client the new data. Upon receiving the data, the client immediately sends a new request and waits for the next update.

Here is the flow:

Page loads:

 __________                              _________
|          |                            |         |
| Client A | ---> Request for Data ---> | Server  |
|__________|                            |_________|

Then what? Suspense:

 __________                              _________
|          |                            |         |
| Client A | .......................... | Server  |
| waiting  |                            | waiting |
|__________|                            |_________|

Someone else updates content you want to see in real time:

                     __________
                    |          |
                    | Client B |
                    |__________|
                         |
                         | Sends update to Server
                         |___________________.
                                             |
                                             V
 __________                              _________
|          |                            |         |
| client A | ............<------------- | Server  |
| waiting  |                            | Reacts  |
|__________|                            |_________|
     |
     |
     V    
 __________                              _________
|          |                            |         |
| Client A |   ( No open connection)    | Server  |
| Updates  |                            | Idle... |
|__________|                            |_________|
     |
     |
     V
 ___________                              _________
|           |                            |         |
| Client A  |                            |         |
| Reacts to |                            | Server  |
| Update    | ---> Request for Data ---> |         |
|___________|                            |_________|

Rinse, Repeat The thing to remember here is that HTTP1.1 supports a persistent connection, meaning it won't timeout unless you want it to. I'd recommend looking into NodeJS on your server side to trigger these events.

share|improve this answer
    
yes...this seems to somewhat what i am looking for. My index.php susbscribes for some real time data to the server and the callback url is callback.php. the server send the change notification to callback.php. I want to see the change notification which is stored in $updates. –  Praveen Oct 9 '11 at 22:19
    
when you say server side do u mean the server itself or the callback.php file? i do not control the server that sends the change notification to callback.php. –  Praveen Oct 9 '11 at 22:33
    
You have to have some kind of event listener on the server. PHP is generally not the best solution for listeners because of the blocking I/O. For example, if you wanted your PHP script to check the database every second for new posts from other users, you'd have to use sleep(1000), which halts the script and prevents other scripts from running. This is one of the main benefits of NodeJS. –  AlienWebguy Oct 9 '11 at 22:42

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