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I am attempting to solve Sudoku as a constraint satisfaction problem for a homework assignment. I have already constructed constraints for all the elements in a particular row being distinct, as well as for columns. I am trying to construct the constraints for the elements in a sub-region being distinct, and I'm running into some trouble.

The general idea behind my current algorithm is to add all of the variables that are in a sub-region (e.g. a 3x3 box for a 9x9 grid) into a list, and then permute all the values in that list to construct NotEqualConstraints between each variable. The code below works properly for the 1st subregion of a NxN grid, but I am not sure how I should change this to iterate through the rest of the entire grid.

int incSize = (int)Math.sqrt(svars.length);

ArrayList<Variable> subBox = new ArrayList<Variable>();

for (int ind = 0; ind < incSize; ind++) {
for (int ind2 = 0; ind2 < incSize; ind2++) {
    subBox.add(svars[ind][ind2]);
    }
}

for (int i = 0; i < subBox.size(); i++) {
for (int j = i + 1; j < subBox.size(); j++) {
   NotEqualConstraint row = new NotEqualConstraint(subBox.get(i), subBox.get(j));
   constraints.add(row);
   }
}

Can anyone guide me in the right direction about how I can modify the code to hit each subregion and not just the top left one?

edit: I am also open to trying any algorithm that works, it is not necessary to add all of the values to an ArrayList for each sub-region. If you see a better way, please share insight

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1  
Arr, what be ye question, me lad? –  Bojangles Oct 9 '11 at 22:21
    
The given code iterates through the first subregion start at the top left of the grid, but not each subregion of the grid. –  Ben Siver Oct 9 '11 at 22:22
    
It's just simple arithmetic, nothing more. If you worked it out on paper, you'd see the algorithm immediately. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Oct 9 '11 at 22:27
1  
I've been working it out on paper for a while, not quite so easy for me :/ –  Ben Siver Oct 9 '11 at 22:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is the working solution I came up with, for those interested:

for (int ofs = 0; ofs < svars.length; ofs++) {
    int col = (ofs % incSize) * incSize;
    int row = ((int)(ofs / incSize)) * incSize;

    ArrayList<Variable> subBox = new ArrayList<Variable>();
    for (int ind = row; ind < row+incSize; ind++) {
        for (int ind2 = col; ind2 < col+incSize; ind2++) {
            subBox.add(svars[ind][ind2]);
        }
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < subBox.size(); i++) {
            for (int j = i + 1; j < subBox.size(); j++) {
               NotEqualConstraint c = new NotEqualConstraint(subBox.get(i), subBox.get(j));
               constraints.add(c);
            }
    }   
}
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I'm not entirely certain what you're trying to do, but the below algorithm should give you every value you need. You can just ignore and/or remove the values you don't need. You could probably fill all your arrays appropriately at the point where you have all the numbers.

The words I use:

  • square: a single square to put a number in.
  • subregion: a group of squares, a 3x3 grid in the classic sudoku.
  • puzzle: the whole thing, 3x3 subregions and 9x9 squares.

Code:

//You should have these values at this point:
int subRegionWidth = something; //amount of horizontal squares in a subregion
int subRegionHeight = something; //amount of vertical squares in a subregion
int amountOfHorizontalSubRegions = something; //amount of subRegion columns next to each other
int amountOfVerticalSubRegions = something; //amount of subregion rows on top of each other

//Doesn't change, so calculated once in advance:
int squaresPerPuzzleRow = subRegionWidth*amountOfHorizontalSubRegions;

//Variables to use inside the loop:
int subRegionIndex = 0;
int squareColumnInPuzzle;
int squareRowInPuzzle;
int squareIndexInPuzzle;
int squareIndexInSubRegion;

for(int subRegionRow=0; subRegionRow<amountOfVerticalSubRegions;subRegionRow++)
{
    for(int subRegionColumn=0; subRegionColumn<amountOfHorizontalSubRegions;subRegionColumn++)
    {
        for(int squareRowInRegion=0; squareRowInRegion<subRegionHeight; squareRowInRegion++)
        {
            for(int squareColumnInRegion=0; squareColumnInRegion<subRegionWidth; squareColumnInRegion++)
            {
                squareColumnInPuzzle = subRegionColumn*subRegionWidth + squareColumnInRegion;
                squareRowInPuzzle = subRegionRow*subRegionHeight + squareRowInRegion;
                squareIndexInPuzzle = squareRowInPuzzle*squaresPerPuzzleRow + squareColumnInPuzzle;
                squareIndexInSubRegion = squareRowInRegion*subRegionWidth + squareColumnInRegion;

                //You now have all the information of a square:

                //The subregion's row (subRegionRow)
                //The subregion's column (subRegionColumn)
                //The subregion's index (subRegionIndex)
                //The square's row within the puzzle (squareRowInPuzzle)
                //The square's column within the puzzle (squareColumnInPuzzle)
                //The square's index within the puzzle (squareIndexInPuzzle)
                //The square's row within the subregion (squareRowInSubRegion)
                //The square's column within the subregion (squareColumnInSubRegion)
                //The square's index within the subregion (squareIndexInSubRegion)

                //You'll get this once for all squares, add the code to do something with it here.
            }
        }
        subRegionIndex++;
    }
}

If you only need the top left squares per subregion, just remove the inner two loops:

for(int subRegionRow=0; subRegionRow<amountOfVerticalSubRegions;subRegionRow++)
{
    for(int subRegionColumn=0; subRegionColumn<amountOfHorizontalSubRegions;subRegionColumn++)
    {
        squareColumnInPuzzle = subRegionColumn*subRegionWidth;
        squareRowInPuzzle = subRegionRow*subRegionHeight;
        squareIndexInPuzzle = squareRowInPuzzle*squaresPerPuzzleRow + squareColumnInPuzzle;

        //You now have all the information of a top left square:

        //The subregion's row (subRegionRow)
        //The subregion's column (subRegionColumn)
        //The subregion's index (subRegionIndex)
        //The square's row within the puzzle (squareRowInPuzzle)
        //The square's column within the puzzle (squareColumnInPuzzle)
        //The square's index within the puzzle (squareIndexInPuzzle)
        //The square's row within the subregion (always 0)
        //The square's column within the subregion (always 0)
        //The square's index within the subregion (always 0)

        //You'll get this once for all squares, add the code to do something with it here.

        subRegionIndex++;
    }
}
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for (int start1 = start1; start1 < svars.length/incSize; start1 ++) {
    for (int start2 = start2; start2 < svars.length/incSize; start2++) {//iterate through all subsets
        ArrayList<Variable> subBox = new ArrayList<Variable>();

        for (int ind = start1*incSize; ind < incSize; ind++) {
            for (int ind2 = start2*incSize; ind2 < incSize; ind2++) {
                 subBox.add(svars[ind][ind2]);
            }
        }

       for (int i = 0; i < subBox.size(); i++) {
        for (int j = i + 1; j < subBox.size(); j++) {
           NotEqualConstraint row = new NotEqualConstraint(subBox.get(i), subBox.get(j));
           constraints.add(row);
           }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
you can not compile the above code snippet. for some strange reason you are initializing start1 to itself without ever initializing start1. Same can be said of start2. –  Sashwat Oct 9 '11 at 22:37
    
Thanks for the quick response. I'm not sure your algorithm is correct, however, as I tested it and does not recognize when every subregion besides the first has duplicate numbers. Note, I did change start1 and start2 to be initialized to 0. –  Ben Siver Oct 9 '11 at 22:38

I didn't completely understand what you are trying to do but if you are trying to solve the puzzle you just need a recursive method that will put in numbers until it fills all the grid and puzzle is valid.That was my solution for a futoshiki puzzle solver( similar to sudoku)

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I am solving the puzzle as a constraint satisfaction problem. I have an algorithm to solve the puzzle once the constraints are established (the step I am stuck on), that is more efficient than brute force. –  Ben Siver Oct 12 '11 at 15:10
    
Downvote as post states explicitly as CSP problem. The obvious solution is recursion, as CSP will require 27*9! about 6 million different constraints... –  Per Alexandersson Oct 13 '11 at 20:47
    
How do you reason that number? The number of constraints for 9x9 should be 810, 4x4 should be 56. –  Ben Siver Oct 13 '11 at 22:32

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