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I noticed this semi weirdish-behavior in one of my projects using Scheme and lists. I managed to isolate the behavior into a single section. The code is:

(define x (list 1 2 3))
(define y (list 4 5))
(define z (cons (car x) (cdr y)))
(define w (append y z))
(define v (cons (cdr x) (cdr y)))
(set-car! x 6)
(set-car! y 7)
(set-cdr! (cdr x) (list 8))

x
y
z
w
v

Gives us the output of:

(6 2 8)
(7 5)
(1 5)
(4 5 1 5)
((2 8) 5)

Can anyone explain to me:

  1. Why does (set-car! x 6) not update Z? Since according to my understanding car/cdr return pointers or references to the corresponding values. This is really weird and I'm kinda confused.
  2. If car/cdr does not return references/pointers then how is the final set-cdr! manipulating the list v?

Any ideas? It's a simple fix, but I'm more curious as to why the weirdness with the variables is going on.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Okay, let's step through your program line by line. I'm also assigning unique numbers (think of them as object addresses, if you're used to C-like languages) for each newly-created object so you can see what's what. :-)

(define x (list 1 2 3))             ; => #1 = (1 . #2), #2 = (2 . #3), #3 = (3 . ())
(define y (list 4 5))               ; => #4 = (4 . #5), #5 = (5 . ())
(define z (cons (car x) (cdr y)))   ; => #6 = (1 . #5)
(define w (append y z))             ; => #7 = (4 . #8), #8 = (5 . #6)
(define v (cons (cdr x) (cdr y)))   ; => #9 = (#2 . #5)
(set-car! x 6)                      ; => #1 = (6 . #2)
(set-car! y 7)                      ; => #4 = (7 . #5)
(set-cdr! (cdr x) (list 8))         ; => #2 = (2 . #10), #10 = (8 . ())

Now, let's look at your values (for each reference, use the last assigned value):

x   ; #1 => (6 . #2) => (6 . (2 . #10)) => (6 2 8)
y   ; #4 => (7 . #5) => (7 5)
z   ; #6 => (1 . #5) => (1 5)
w   ; #7 => (4 . #8) => (4 . (5 . #6)) => (4 . (5 . (1 . #5))) => (4 5 1 5)
v   ; #9 => (#2 . #5) => ((2 . #10) 5) => ((2 8) 5)

Edit: I'm adding a diagram to explain my answer, since you can't have diagrams in a comment. I don't have time to make a diagram showing the values above, but this hopefully explains a few things.

Expression tree

Each pair has two "slots", car and cdr, represented as the left and right boxes in the diagram above. Each of these slots, as you see, has three possible things:

  1. An atom (a number in your examples, or symbols in the diagram, such as let, s5, and sqrt)
  2. A reference (represented as an arrow in the diagram)
  3. Null (represented as a black box in the diagram)

You can put any of these in any of the slots. So, in my explanation above, each of the # items is an arrow, each of the non-# numbers is an atom, and each of the () is a black box. So, in the line

(define v (cons (cdr x) (cdr y)))

you are creating a pair, where the left-hand slot has the same contents as the right-hand slot of x (i.e., an arrow going to pair 2), and the right-hand slot has the same contents as the right-hand slot of y (an arrow going to pair 5). In other words, both boxes in v contain arrows, each going off a different pair.

Hope this makes more sense. :-)

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Can you explain more related to V? Why does cons part for Z return values(#6), but cons of (cdr x)(cdr y) (#9) still be bound to two references? –  UberJumper Apr 21 '09 at 2:48
    
both z and v are defined as the cons of two existing values; but the car of z is a number (immutable value), while the car of v is a cons cell (mutable value, shared). set-car! and set-cdr! modify cons cells, not the values they hold. –  Javier Apr 21 '09 at 3:07
2  
+1 for the diagram. What did you use to make that? –  Kyle Cronin Apr 21 '09 at 4:01
    
Xfig (xfig.org). :-) –  Chris Jester-Young Apr 21 '09 at 6:49
    
it is simpler to consider that all values in Scheme are references (like Python), but some objects are immutable (numbers, symbols, nil), and some are mutable (pairs) –  user102008 Sep 27 '11 at 19:12

(define z (cons (car x) (cdr y))) has allocated a new cons cell for the head of z. The head of x is a different cons cell to the head of z, so changing the contents of this cons cell for x does not change z.

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If you assume that, then why does set-cdr! manipulate v? –  UberJumper Apr 21 '09 at 2:46
    
uberjumper: It doesn't. It manipulates the cons cell that the cdr of x points to, which is the same as the one that the car of v points to. v itself remains unchanged, as does x (by the set-cdr! call, I mean). –  Matthias Benkard Apr 21 '09 at 8:16

remember that each variable doesn't hold a list, they hold just a cons cell. a list (or a tree) is a composite structure of several cons cells, some of which may be shared between several structures.

also, you're thinking about pointers and references, instead of thinking about values, which can be either immutable values (like numbers, or symbols) or mutable values (like conses or strings) mutable values are allocated, garbage collected and passed by reference.

one last point to remember: the cons procedure always allocates a new cons cell.

after (define z (cons (car x) (cdr y))), z holds a brand new cons with the same as x and the same car as x, and the same cdr as y. when you (set-car! x), you just change the x cons cell, not z.

after (define v (cons (cdr x) (cdr y))), v holds a brand new cons whose car is the same value as the cdr of x; that is a cons cell. the very same cons cell as (cdr x). it's shared by the two lists. when that shared cons cell is modified by (set-cdr! (cdr x) ...), both lists are affected.

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The box and pointer diagrams illustrate the example @chris made:

(define x (list 1 2 3))             ; => #1 = (1 . #2), #2 = (2 . #3), #3 = (3 . ())
(define y (list 4 5))               ; => #4 = (4 . #5), #5 = (5 . ())
(define z (cons (car x) (cdr y)))   ; => #6 = (1 . #5)
(define w (append y z))             ; => #7 = (4 . #8), #8 = (5 . #6)
(define v (cons (cdr x) (cdr y)))   ; => #9 = (#2 . #5)
(set-car! x 6)                      ; => #1 = (6 . #2)
(set-car! y 7)                      ; => #4 = (7 . #5)
(set-cdr! (cdr x) (list 8))         ; => #2 = (2 . #10), #10 = (8 . ())

enter image description here

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