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Here is the pseudo code which computes division of two positive integers.
HR register saves reminder, and LR saves dividend. (and eventually saves root)
However I think this algorithm has some problem.
Because this algorithm sometimes don't recover subtracion.(Division is a continuation of subtraction.)
For example 6 / 3 (0110 / 011)
This algorithm subtract -3 one more time. (This situation never occur when we calculate this division by hand)
So I think this algorithm has some problem.
Don't you agree with me? How to calculate division reminder in Assembly?

for i = 1 to num_of_bits do
(HR LR) << 1
if (HR >= 0) then
   HR = HR - DIVISOR
else
   HR = HR + DIVISOR
endif
if (HR > 0) then LR(lsb) = 1 endif
endfor
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This is assembly?! For what chip? –  Matt Phillips Oct 10 '11 at 4:13
    
in SPARC. I must have written what architecture is.. –  manutd Oct 10 '11 at 4:53
1  
stackoverflow.com/questions/5189631/…. As originally asked, the question was about the 6800, but the answer is about eqally applicable to any processor without a divide instruction. –  Jerry Coffin Oct 10 '11 at 5:34
    
@JerryCoffin Wow, That's so awesome! –  manutd Oct 10 '11 at 8:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't speak SPARC asm, but I do speak C. Here's a sample implementation of the algorithm for 16/8=8,8 division:

#include <stdio.h>

typedef unsigned char uint8;
typedef unsigned int uint;

int u8div(uint8* dividendh, uint8* dividendl, uint8 divisor)
{
  int i;

  if (*dividendh >= divisor)
    return 0; // overflow

  for (i = 0; i < 8; i++)
  {
    if (*dividendh >= 0x80)
    {
      *dividendh = (*dividendh << 1) | (*dividendl >> (8 - 1));
      *dividendl <<= 1;

      *dividendh -= divisor;
      *dividendl |= 1;
    }
    else
    {
      *dividendh = (*dividendh << 1) | (*dividendl >> (8 - 1));
      *dividendl <<= 1;

      if (*dividendh >= divisor)
      {
        *dividendh -= divisor;
        *dividendl |= 1;
      }
    }
  }

  return 1;
}

int u8div2(uint8* dividendh, uint8* dividendl, uint8 divisor)
{
  uint dividend = (*dividendh << 8) | *dividendl;

  if (*dividendh >= divisor)
    return 0; // overflow

  *dividendl = dividend / divisor;
  *dividendh = dividend % divisor;

  return 1;
}

int main(void)
{
  uint dividendh, dividendl, divisor;

  for (dividendh = 0; dividendh <= 0xFF; dividendh++)
    for (dividendl = 0; dividendl <= 0xFF; dividendl++)
      for (divisor = 0; divisor <= 0xFF; divisor++)
      {
        uint8 divh = dividendh, divl = dividendl, divr = divisor;
        uint8 divh2 = dividendh, divl2 = dividendl;

        printf("0x%04X/0x%02X=", (divh << 8) | divl, divr);

        if (u8div(&divh, &divl, divr))
          printf("0x%02X.0x%02X", divl, divh);
        else
          printf("ovf");

        printf(" ");

        if (u8div2(&divh2, &divl2, divr))
          printf("0x%02X.0x%02X", divl2, divh2);
        else
          printf("ovf");

        if ((divl != divl2) || (divh != divh2))
          printf(" err"); // "err" will be printed if u8div() computes incorrect result

        printf("\n");
      }

  return 0;
}
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I think that if (*dividendh >= 0x80) { *dividendh = (*dividendh << 1) | (*dividendl >> (8 - 1)); *dividendl <<= 1; *dividendh -= divisor; *dividendl |= 1; } is not necessary –  manutd Oct 10 '11 at 10:30
    
@manutd: if you remove that part, the code won't always work correctly. I'm going to update the answer with more code to demonstrate it. –  Alexey Frunze Oct 10 '11 at 10:49
    
I agree with you in case of that dividendh has some initial value (!= 0) But If dividendh has initial value as 0, The result of two function is same. –  manutd Oct 10 '11 at 11:47
    
Could you tell me Why did you put non-zero value in dividendh? Isn't it a reminder? If it is reminder, Wouldn't it be better to set the initial value of dividendh to zero? –  manutd Oct 10 '11 at 11:51
    
@manutd: many CPUs's division instructions divide 2N bits by N bits (and return N bits of quotient and N bits of remainder) basically doing the opposite of multiplication where you multiply N bits by N bits and get 2N bits. That's what I did. The calculations are done in-place (the remainder appears in dividendh and quotient in dividendl), which is also very typical of those divide instructions and division subroutines. –  Alexey Frunze Oct 10 '11 at 11:56

Several implementation of the division algorithm (that also computes the remainder) can be found in appendix E of the SPARC architecture manual.

Newer version of the SPARC architecture include the division operators UDIV and SDIV.

A furhter implemenation can be found here.

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