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I'm playing around with OpenGL ES 2.0 in Android, and looking through the docs for GLES20 I came across the following methods:

public static void glDrawElements(
    int mode, int count, int type, Buffer indices)
public static void glDrawElements(
    int mode, int count, int type, int offset)

public static void glVertexAttribPointer(
    int indx, int size, int type, boolean normalized, int stride, Buffer ptr)
public static void glVertexAttribPointer(
    int indx, int size, int type, boolean normalized, int stride, int offset)

The two methods that take Buffer objects make sense to me, but the other two don't. Where do they get the indices/attibute-values (respectively), and what is offset an offset into? (I assume these two questions have the same answer.)

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The two weird methods are both tagged "Level 9", (and I'm currently coding for level 8), so this is more to satisfy my curiosity than anything else... –  Laurence Gonsalves Oct 10 '11 at 5:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Offset in the prototype means that you are submitting the INDEX array in prior to this call.That should be used if you are using VBO's(Vertex Buffer Objects).Use glBindBuffer to bind the index buffer and specify an offset if needed in the next call.

First you need to bind the buffer(Index buffer here) and you can specify from where your elements start with an 'offset'.

glBindBuffer(GL_ELEMENT_ARRAY_BUFFER, g_resources.element_buffer);
glDrawElements(
    GL_TRIANGLE_STRIP,  /* mode */
    4,                  /* count */
    GL_UNSIGNED_SHORT,  /* type */
    (void*)0            /* element array buffer offset */
);

for

 public static void glVertexAttribPointer(
int indx, int size, int type, boolean normalized, int stride, int offset)

This means that you are submitting vertex buffer in prior to this call and you can specify the offset from where it should take with in the buffer. Please check the following link for additional help. http://duriansoftware.com/joe/An-intro-to-modern-OpenGL.-Chapter-2.3:-Rendering.html

As you expected, The both have the same reason :) .Hope this helps!

Update: you need to create a buffer to bind it.This can be done by the following steps.

     glGenBuffers(); // create a buffer object
     glBindBuffer(); // use the buffer
     glBufferData(); // allocate memory in the buffer

Check this link for creating a VBO. http://www.opengl.org/wiki/Vertex_Buffer_Object

Regarding the Offset type: The offset is passed as a pointer, but the parameter is used for its integer value, so we pass an integer cast to void*.

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Thanks, but what would a non-zero "offset" turn into, when above you seem to be using NULL? Also, GLES.glBindBuffer just takes a couple of ints. Where do the n indices/attribute-values get passed? I don't know anything about VBOs... I guess I still have some reading to do. –  Laurence Gonsalves Oct 10 '11 at 6:23
    
@LaurenceGonsalves:added an update for you questions.Let me know if any doubts related to this. –  Ayyappa Oct 10 '11 at 6:41
    
Thanks. That clears things up. Part of my confusion also seemed to come from the fact that I was looking at OpenGL (not-ES) docs for glDrawElements, and didn't see any mention of the weird dual-usage of the pointer. (And as an aside: Ick! Why did they do that? OpenGL usually isn't shy about adding extra functions for different kinds of arguments.) –  Laurence Gonsalves Oct 10 '11 at 21:21
    
@LaurenceGonsalves:yeah! its weird for me as well!But in some links it is for "Historical reasons"! - Damn! i really dont know what that mean :P –  Ayyappa Oct 11 '11 at 10:08

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