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I have a movieclip called Tab that has two text-fields: named toptxt and bottomtxt. When I create new instances of Tab in a for loop and change the text, only the first instance's text is changed. The rest is the default text in the movieclip.

Here is the code I am using:

for(var i = 0; i < 5; i++){
    var newTab = new Tab();
    newTab.toptxt.text = nameArray[i]; //nameArray is fine
    trace(newTab.toptxt.text); //returns expected value, textfield isn't
    newTab.bottomtxt.text = jobs[i];
    bottom.addChild(newTab); //bottom is a class var.
    newTab.x = i * (newTab.width + 3);
}

Even if I change nameArray[i] to "Test", only the first one works.

This problem does not occur if I don't do it in for loops, however I'd like to do it in a for loop.

Here is a screenshot of the problem: http://i.imgur.com/hgPZ5.png

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Pull your declaration of var newTab = new Tab(); outside of the for loop, so your code looks like this:

 var newTab:Tab;
 for(var i:int = 0; i < 5; i++){
    newTab = new Tab();
    newTab.toptxt.text = nameArray[i]; //nameArray is fine
    trace(newTab.toptxt.text); //returns expected value, textfield isn't
    newTab.bottomtxt.text = jobs[i];
    bottom.addChild(newTab); //bottom is a class var.
    newTab.x = i * (newTab.width + 3);
}

Actionscript is becoming confused when you create an instance and assign newTab as a pointer to it, instead of creating a pointer or reference initially, and then creating new instances and adding them to your displayList.

Also, trace your output of nameArray[i] and confirm that those values are correct (i.e. trace(nameArray[i]);. It's possible the data isn't set properly earlier in your code.

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Thanks! I thought actionscript throws out every variable scoped to the for loop through? –  gladsocc Oct 10 '11 at 5:38
1  
you answer makes little sense, it won't matter where the declaration of the variable is, especially since actionscript does variable hoisting, so any declarations will be at the "top" of the function anyway. –  grapefrukt Oct 10 '11 at 5:38
    
The variable isn't "thrown away". The reference to the instance is created and assigned to some block of memory. You're creating same-name references and assigning them to different blocks in memory. That's fun for creating objects where you might pass in arguments via the constructor (i.e. new Tab(firstname, jobtitle). But you're using that reference later and losing it because it matches other, identical references. Instead, set the reference outside, and merely update what instance it points to. –  Dominic Tancredi Oct 10 '11 at 5:43
    
hoisting moves the declaration to the top, during compile, but the issue is about assignment and reference to the specific instance. with hoisting, you could call assignments prior to declaration. –  Dominic Tancredi Oct 10 '11 at 6:09

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