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For unsigned int x, is it possible to calculate x % 255 (or 2^n - 1 in general) using only the following operators (plus no loop, branch or function call)?

!, ~, &, ^, |, +, <<, >>.

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Almost certainly no - the only tricks for this kind of thing tend to be for powers of 2. Essentially you need to implement an integer division algo - I guess you could do something with an unrolled loop but it might still need conditionals and it would be ugly and inefficient. –  Paul R Oct 10 '11 at 7:28
2  
@Paul R: While it's true that these kind of things are usually restricted to powers-of-two. This is one of the not-so-obvious exceptions. –  Mysticial Oct 10 '11 at 7:38
    
@Mysticial: Cool - I didn't know that - thanks. –  Paul R Oct 10 '11 at 8:06
    
If this is homework, please tag it as "homework". If it isn't, why the arbitrary restrictions? –  Keith Thompson Oct 12 '11 at 2:27

3 Answers 3

Sure. Just get out one of your old computer architecture textbooks and refresh your memory on boolean algebra. A CPU's ALU does it with ANDs and ORs; you can, too.

But why?

An academic exercise? Homework? Curiousity?

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Not really: a CPU does all not only with basic arithmetic operations but also with loops (the OP wants a solution without branches and calls). So I would say no. –  Matteo Oct 10 '11 at 7:31

Yes, it's possible. For 255, it can be done as follows:

unsigned int x = 4023156861;

x = (x & 255) + (x >> 8);
x = (x & 255) + (x >> 8);
x = (x & 255) + (x >> 8);
x = (x & 255) + (x >> 8);

//  At this point, x will be in the range: 0 <= x < 256.
//  If the answer 0, x could potentially be 255 which is not fully reduced.

//  Here's an ugly way of implementing: if (x == 255) x -= 255;
//  (See comments for a simpler version by Paul R.)
unsigned int t = (x + 1) >> 8;
t = !t + 0xffffffff;
t &= 255;
x += ~t + 1;

// x = 186

This will work if unsigned int is a 32-bit integer.

EDIT: The pattern should be obvious enough to see how this can be generalized to 2^n - 1. You just have to figure out how many iterations are needed. For n = 8 and a 32-bit integer, 4 iterations should be enough.

EDIT 2:

Here's a slightly more optimized version combined with Paul R.'s conditional subtract code:

unsigned int x = 4023156861;

x = (x & 65535) + (x >> 16);     //  Reduce to 17 bits
x = (x & 255) + (x >> 8);        //  Reduce to 9 bits
x = (x & 255) + (x >> 8);        //  Reduce to 8 bits
x = (x + ((x + 1) >> 8)) & 255;  //  Reduce to < 255
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Looks good but seems to fail in some cases, e.g. x = 86817555 ? I ran 1000000 random test cases through the above code and got good = 996132, bad = 3868, so evidently something is not quite right ? (FWIW the cases that fail seem to give 255 when the result should be 0.) –  Paul R Oct 10 '11 at 8:21
    
@Paul R: Good catch. I missed this corner case. One more step at the end will needed to reduce 255 to 0. Lemme fix. –  Mysticial Oct 10 '11 at 8:23
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Great - that works now - note that you can probably simplify the last part to this: x = (x + ((x + 1) >> 8)) & 255;` - that's only 4 logical/arithmetic operations versus 7. –  Paul R Oct 10 '11 at 9:31
    
@Paul R: Yeah, I was wondering about that last part since I didn't try very hard to simplify it. I'll edit the answer to point to your simpler version. –  Mysticial Oct 10 '11 at 9:35

Just create an array with all the values (only either need 32 or 64 entries (i.e. 128 or 512 bytes). Then just do a look up.

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Can you expand on this - I can't see how such a small lookup table could work for this ? –  Paul R Oct 10 '11 at 8:24

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