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I have multiple entries in a temporary table in Database, and I need to merge them to make permanent entries. Now the information is coming from multiple XML Feeds, and I have all sorts of information, but the closest that I have is the "title" or in my case, name of the product. Unfortunately, I don't have any other way (no same ID's or anything like that) than to match them by their name. So for example I have:

$primary = array('feedid' => 2, 'entry_name' => 'ACME Product Black Model #23');
$secondary = array('feedid' => 3, 'entry_name' => 'ACME Product Model #23');

The ACME Product May Vary from "ACME Product Model #23" to "Model 23", to "Black Model #23", etc. Also, in the same feed I may have "ACME Product Model Black #22" and "CHOAM Product Black - Model 11".

The problem is that I can't just use similar_text() or levenshtein(), because they would sometimes match wrong items, or sometimes just don't match at all. Each feed has 100+ entries, and I can have up to about 10 feeds.

Edit: To put in real terms, for example: "iPhone 4" and "iPhone 4 White" and "iPhone 4 Black" should all be merged ( I can handle the merging, need to match first ). So the rules are - Match the phones in this case. It could also be "Barby Doll White hair" and "Barby Doll Black Hair", but not "Some other Doll with White Hair". ...

Any ideas appreciated :)

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Would it be easy for you to give in plain english the rules required in order to match all records correctly, beause you are the one that know the case better. This would make it much better. –  Melsi Oct 10 '11 at 8:18
    
@Melsi Not sure what you mean by the plain english. The matching issue is that even I can't know what the feeds are going to be matching exactly. I know for sure, that all of them are going to have a product-name. How the name is going to look like, I can't know for sure. I have to figure out how to work with this dynamic data and match correctly as much as I can. –  Norris Oct 10 '11 at 8:22
    
Some questions on this: Would a human be able to do this? If so, what kind of information would he use? Given the four example you have shown, I would not be able to tell, which ones belong together, just by looking at the title. So if somebody is able to do this, that person probably requires extra rules, which you are not giving here. If a person is not able to do this, then doing this automatically is out of the question completely. Computers are better than humans on large data, but worse on task requiring understanding or cognitive power (like this one). –  LiKao Oct 10 '11 at 8:44
    
@LiKao , Why would you have difficulties understanding that "ACME Product #23" is the same as "Product #23 Black". To put in real terms, for example: "iPhone 4" and "iPhone 4 White" and "iPhone 4 Black" should all be merged ( I can handle the merging, need to match first ). So the rules are - Match the phones in this case. It could also be "Barby Doll White hair" and "Barby Doll Black Hair", but not "Some other Doll with White Hair". ... But I see your point in a way. –  Norris Oct 10 '11 at 8:51
    
@Methmer: Because it is not clear, what is important in the titles. For example ACME might just have different version and only one product, so "ACME Product Model #23" and "ACME Product Model Black #22" might actually be the same. I do not know the domain, so I cannot tell. "Model 23" on the hand, might refer to something completely different. If someone would give me this information only, I would first ask them about the company which produced this to make sure. Without detailed domain knowledge this task is impossible. But this domain knowledge is hard to encode. –  LiKao Oct 10 '11 at 8:56
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2 Answers

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I think it is worth to go with the pregmatch that hakre suggests.

I would go like this:

  1. (Optionally) In the old-temporary table would add one more field of tinyint called flag.

  2. I would go with pregmatch and in a pregmatch success I would put a positive flag on the old table to indicate that this record was managed successfuly by pregmatch.

  3. If pregmatch failed would I would go with text similarity as hakre suggests again and would put a flag that was managed with text similarity.

In the end I hope a big percentage of the records would have been managed by pregmatch and only few would hae a flag indicating "text similrity" management. This would make the problem smaller, I think. wouldn't it?

If you later find a better solution you can use the flag to know what records were not managed by pregmatch.

Then as for retrieving the new data I would go with the whith text similarity, for example something like mysql like '%string%'.

As for pregmatch being slow you will only do this process once,so shouldn't be a problem. In addition I would add a conditioned loop in order not to exceed max execution time.

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In a comment your wrote:

I can't know what the feeds are going to be matching exactly

Well if you can not tell, how should anybody else tell you?

You first of need to solve your base problem (get the model number from string), to continue.

Unless you can't, you need to throw an exception, output the model-string you were unable to match, analyse and tweak your parser.

You can more or less easily parse strings by using regular expressions:

$r = preg_match('/Model(?: \w+)? #?(\d+)$/', $string, $matches);
if (!$r) throw new Exception(sprintf('Unable to parse "%s"', $string));
$modelNumber = $matches[1];

That for example works with the example data you've given. But the job to analyse the input is up to you. It can not be specifically answered.

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Not going to work this way. I can't do a regex match on a string. I have 100 entries, that I have to match aginst another 100 Entries. –  Norris Oct 10 '11 at 8:47
    
@Methemer: Use iteration. –  hakre Oct 10 '11 at 8:50
    
@Methemer: Regexes might actually be one method to encode specific domain knowledge. If you know key-words, which are import for your model names, you can use regexes to extract this. Also if you know information that is always irelvant, then regexes might help you get rid of these. In your example for example you could always try to drop "ACME Product" and get the number from after the "#" or at the end. That would allow better matching, but still you will have false positives as well as false negatives. –  LiKao Oct 10 '11 at 9:02
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