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I was told that every method has a stack the size of 1mb. So I assumed that initializing 256 integer values in one method will cause a StackOverflowException. I tried that in code, but no exception was thrown.

So, how to deliberately trigger a StackOverflowException without using recursion?

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6  
256 * 4 bytes = 1kb, not 1mb –  Marc Gravell Oct 10 '11 at 8:27
3  
256 integers is = 256 * 4 bytes = 1024 bytes = 1 kb, not 1 MB. Therefor, you would need 256000 integers. And I wouldn't even try to write a code with 256000 declarations. (edit: and Marc Gravells is always faster) :) –  Kornelije Petak Oct 10 '11 at 8:28
    
oh, my bad, sorry. –  CuiPengFei Oct 10 '11 at 8:28
1  
It would be pretty bad if you could only use 256 * 4 bytes of memory in a single method... On the other hand, it would probably help keep methods small! :-) –  Michael Kjörling Oct 10 '11 at 8:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I'll add another method :-)

unsafe struct FixedBufferExample
{
    public fixed byte Buffer[128 * 1024]; // This is a fixed buffer.
}

Now this structure is 128kb :-) If you declare a local variable (of a method that doesn't use yield or async) of type FixedBufferExample it should use 128kb of stack. You can use up your stack quite quickly.

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1  
aye, that'll do it ;p –  Marc Gravell Oct 10 '11 at 8:58

use

throw new StackOverflowException ();
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+1. Always use the simplest approach that gets the result you are after? :) –  Michael Kjörling Oct 10 '11 at 8:29
    
yes - something like that :-) –  Yahia Oct 10 '11 at 8:30

stackalloc is probably the easiest way (assuming you want the runtime to throw the error, rather than yourself):

    unsafe void Boom()
    {
        int* data = stackalloc int[512 * 1024]; // 2MB
    }
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1  
is there any difference if used on 64 Bit system ? Is the stack bigger ? –  Yahia Oct 10 '11 at 8:33
    
@Yahia good question ;p –  Marc Gravell Oct 10 '11 at 8:34

Call your property inside your property (it's recursion, but it's so common I've had to mention it):

int MyProperty
{
   set { MyProperty = value; }
}
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3  
he has already mentioned trigger a StackOverflowException without using recursion, so how does this figure in here ? –  V4Vendetta Oct 10 '11 at 8:42

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