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After searching quite a bit in the Internet for a solution I decided to ask here if my solution is fine.

I'm trying to write a simple and modular C logging library intended to be simple to disable and specially helping PhD students and researchers to debug an algorithm reducing as much as possibile the impact of the logging system.

My problem is that I want make possible for the user of the library to disable the logging system at compile time producing an executable in which the cost of the logger is 0.

The C code would look like this:

...
logger_t * logger;

result = logger_init(logger);
if(result == -1) {...}
...

this will simply initialize the logger. Looking for an example code I have checked the assert.h header but that soulution results in a list of warnings in my case. In fact, if logger_init() is substituted by 0 using the macro this will result in the variable logger never used.

For this reason I've decided to use this approach:

int logger_init(logger_t *logger);

#ifndef NLOG /* NLOG not defined -> enable logging */
int logger_init(logger_t *logger) {
...
}
#else  /* NLOG defined --> the logging system must be disabled */
#define logger_init(logger)     (int)((logger = NULL) == NULL)
#endif /* NLOG */

this does not result in warnings and I also avoid the overhead of calling the function. In fact my first try was to do like this:

int logger_init(logger_t *logger) {
  #ifndef NLOG /* NLOG not defined -> enable logging */
  ...
  #endif
  return 0;
}

keep calling the function even if I do not need it.

Do you think my solution could be considered a good solution? Is there a better solution?

Thanks a lot, guys! Cheers, Armando

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The standard idiom for that, at least in the 90s, was:

#ifndef NLOG
void logger_init(logger_t *logger);
void logger_log(logger_t *logger, ...);
#else
#define logger_init (void)sizeof
#define logger_log  (void)sizeof
#endif

Remember that sizeof operands are not evaluated, although they are syntax checked. This trick works also with variadic functions, because the sizeof operator will see an expresion with several comma operators:

logger_log(log, 1, 2, 3);

Converts to:

(void)sizeof(log, 1, 2, 3);

Those commas are not separating parameters (sizeof is not a function but an operator), but they are comma operators.

Note that I changed the return value from int to void. No real need for that, but the sizeof return would be mostly meaningless.

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absolutely clear. I will stick to this solution! thanks a lot –  Armando Oct 10 '11 at 11:13
    
trying the solution right now, turns out to produce this warning: "warning: left-hand operand of comma expression has no effect [-Wunused-value]", because of the list of parameters passed to the operator sizeof. What could be a work-arround? –  Armando Oct 10 '11 at 12:29
    
It is difficult to write a code that does nothing, and at the same time avoid all the compiler warnings about code doing nothing. And even if you make it, using a smart trick, whenever you upgrade your compiler, you'll get the warnings again. So my advice here is just to add -Wno-unused-value to your compiler command. Other option would be to do #define logger_init(x) (void)0, but if you have variadic functions, you'll need variadic macros, too. And you may get unused warnings for other reasons... –  rodrigo Oct 10 '11 at 12:51
    
just for proposing another solution. For having it applied to variadic also, a solution like this could be considered fine? #define logger_log(logger, ...) logger && 0 in this way I avoid warning and it applies to variadic also and gives me back a 0 value.. thnx again, Armando –  Armando Oct 10 '11 at 13:54
    
no sure.. I have the same warning .. sure.. Ok, I will point out the necessity of placing this option. Thanks again! –  Armando Oct 10 '11 at 13:56

Can't your disabled version simply be a constant:

#ifndef NLOG /* NLOG not defined -> enable logging */
int logger_init(logger_t *logger) {
...
}
#else  /* NLOG defined --> the logging system must be disabled */
#define logger_init(logger)     0
#endif /* NLOG */

This way, you just have (after pre-compilation): result = 0; which shouldn't produce any warnings.

share|improve this answer
    
As I wrote, the problem with this is that the variable logger is no longer needed and the compiler rises warnings because of this. –  Armando Oct 10 '11 at 11:12
    
Sorry, mis-read that bit... will think again! –  asc99c Oct 10 '11 at 11:18

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