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I have a query which returns 20 rows.

select year( ArticleDate )
from NewsData nd
inner join NewsCategories nc on nd.DirectNewsID = nc.DirectNewsID
where nd.Deleted = 0
and year( nd.ArticleDate ) = 2006
group by nd.DirectNewsID;

Is it possible to get this to return a single row with the number 20 followed by the year in the and section?

The end query will not contain and year( nd.ArticleDate ) = 2006, so it will return a single row per year with the count. I only added the and year( nd.ArticleDate ) = 2006 for testing purposes.

Is this possible?

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SELECT YEAR(nd.ArticleDate), COUNT(*) AS cnt ... GROUP BY nd.DirectNewsID, YEAR(nd.ArticleDate) –  ypercube Oct 10 '11 at 11:11
    
That breaks a single year into too many rows. It should be a single row per year. –  oshirowanen Oct 10 '11 at 11:15
    
Then GROUP BY YEAR(nd.ArticleDate) only. –  ypercube Oct 10 '11 at 11:17
1  
@oshirowanen your question title and detail confusing others , please make it clear , as you post in comments of answers. please edit it –  rahularyansharma Oct 10 '11 at 11:19
    
It is advisable to include sample data, with the results that you require. This often allows a tangible and direct way of defining what you want without needing to know how to express the solution in the first place. –  MatBailie Oct 10 '11 at 11:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Something like this?

select year(nd.ArticleDate), COUNT(DISTINCT nd.DirectNewsID)
from NewsData nd
inner join NewsCategories nc on nd.DirectNewsID = nc.DirectNewsID
where nd.Deleted = 0
group by year(nd.ArticleDate);

EDIT

This now counts the distinct occurances of nd.DirectNewsID in each year.

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That seems to break down the year into many rows, i.e. at the moment, it gave me 5 rows with 2006 and a different count next to each row. I was after just 1 row per year with the count of all of 2006 for example. The same for the rest of the years. –  oshirowanen Oct 10 '11 at 11:13
    
That is due to the nd.DirectNewsID in the GROUP BY from your original query. Do you want to NOT group by nd.DirectNewsID? If that's the case, simply remove it from both the SELECT and GROUP BY clauses of the query. –  MatBailie Oct 10 '11 at 11:30
1  
Based on a comment to another question, I think I've realised what you wanted, see the change above. –  MatBailie Oct 10 '11 at 11:31

Try:

select year( nd.ArticleDate ), count(*)
from NewsData nd
inner join NewsCategories nc on nd.DirectNewsID = nc.DirectNewsID
where nd.Deleted = 0
and year( nd.ArticleDate ) = 2006
group by year( nd.ArticleDate );

Replace count(*) with count(distinct nd.DirectNewsID) if the objective is to determine number of DirectNewsID, instead of total number of rows.

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I think you found what the (confused question meant). I bet it's the count(distinct nd.DirectNewsID). –  ypercube Oct 10 '11 at 11:21

You can use the count method. See: http://www.tizag.com/mysqlTutorial/mysqlcount.php

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You can simply use count method to get the total number of rows. i.e.

select count(*) from NewsData nd inner join NewsCategories nc  where nd.Deleted = 0, nd.DirectNewsID =  c.DirectNewsID  and year( nd.ArticleDate ) = 2006  

Check it.. it should work as per your need

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That gives me too many rows, it should be giving me 20, and not 45. Plus I need it to display the appropriate year next to the count too. –  oshirowanen Oct 10 '11 at 11:17
    
select year( nd.ArticleDate ),count(nd.DirectNewsID) from NewsData nd inner join NewsCategories nc where nd.Deleted = 0 and nd.DirectNewsID = c.DirectNewsID and year( nd.ArticleDate ) = 2006 . try this, may be this can help you, what you need. –  Nishu Tayal Oct 10 '11 at 11:33

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