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I want to detect whether a screen reader is running on a user's machine to avoid sound clashing with audio tag in html. If so, please provide details on how this could be done.

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+1. I don't have any experience of this, but surely a screen reader which supports the <audio> tag would have worked out a way to avoid clashing sounds? it would be core functionality for them, surely? –  Spudley Oct 10 '11 at 11:43
    
It's generally not possible to detect if a screenreader is running. (Even if some accessibility technology is running, it might not be an audio-based screen-reader: it could be a braille-based screenreader, or a command-and-control voice control app that uses some of the same techniques as a screenreader does.) What would you want to do differently if you could determine that a screenreader was running? –  BrendanMcK Oct 10 '11 at 12:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You should probably not try to do anything special even if you could detect that a screenreader is running. Even if you get it right for one group of screenreader users, you may get it wrong for another group. It's best to concentrate on writing good clean HTML5 in the first place.

Note that not all screenreader users use text-to-speech; many use braille output. Additionally, other types of accessibility tools - such as content highlighters and voice input apps - use the same techniques and APIs (eg. DOM, MSAA) that screenreaders do, so any technique that "detects a screenreader" will likely detect these also - so you cannot assume that it means that the user is fully blind and using only speech.

As things currently stand, the audio tag is currently not universally accessible, different browsers have different levels of accessibility support - see HTML5 Accessibility and scroll down to audio for more details of current support. I've seen some pages that add HTML5-based controls plus javascript after the audio tag so they can provide their own UI to ensure that keyboard or screenreader users can play/stop the audio as needed. (Eventually, when browsers catch up, this should not be needed.)

As far as general accessibility goes, WCAG 2.0 (Web Content Accessibility Guidelines) recommends that any audio that plays automatically for more than 3 seconds should have an accessible means to pause or stop the audio. (I'd go even further and recommend against using any automatic audio - when using tabbed browsing, it's often impossible to determine which tab the audio is coming from.)

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While likely not a fully reliable way, a screen reader's progress can be detected via javascript using the focus event, as the user skim though content.

A hidden "skip navigation link" (http://webaim.org/techniques/skipnav/) should it be focuses, would be one way to detect whether someone is using a screenreader.

Even though it doesn't address the audio part of the question, I just wanted to provide this partial solution, as I was looking for possible ways to detect screen-readers myself.

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What about folks who navigate with the keyboard who aren't using a screenreader? –  steveax Apr 18 '13 at 8:49
    
@stevax, To my knowledge, beside the described usual IE quirks, navigating with the keyboard implies a focus event whether you use a screenreader or not. Safari's assisted VoiceOver for example, does apply focus while skimming though content using the keyboard. And a tabindex can be used to force focus on a specific element by order, when the user tab through the page. –  hexalys Apr 19 '13 at 0:11
    
Maybe I wasn't clear in my comment. The point I was trying to make is that it would not be possible to distinguish between screen reader users and folks who for some other reason (possibly a11y related) navigate with the keyboard who aren't employing a screen reader and that trying to target screen reader users this way would probably lead to a big bag of hurt. –  steveax Apr 19 '13 at 2:29
    
I see what you mean. "display:none;" being invisible to screenreader is also a hurdle. However, one conceivable way to do it, would be to tag a middle element as aria-hidden="true" or aria-disabled="true" within 3 consecutive ones. If element 1 and 3 receive focus that would indicate assistive technology being used (for having skipped one), other than a simple keyboard navigation. As I don't foresee any keyboard navigation tools or plugin applying any WAI-ARIA related states or properties. –  hexalys Apr 19 '13 at 6:32

You cannot detect screen readers using javascript, you cannot detect screen readers using any client side technology. You can detect software that is running an MSAA client using Flash. More details about how it works and why it is not useful and should not be used to detect screen readers is available here: Developer Beware: Using Flash to Detect Screen Readers

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@billthelizard, it would be helpful if you provide a reason for deleting comments. –  Steve Faulkner Aug 7 '12 at 8:34

Follow the link http://northtemple.com/2008/10/07/javascript-and-screen-readers Your problem get definitely resolved.

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thanx Arun for info :) –  shuklendu Oct 11 '11 at 11:41
    
Hi friend ...... i am new to stackoverflow pls vote to my answer if your problem get solved –  Untraceable Oct 11 '11 at 13:35
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Hi Arun, your link does provide useful information on making Javascript accessible to screenreaders; but that's not what the OP was asking about. They wanted to know how to detect a screenreader from JS, which the link you posted to doesn't answer. –  BrendanMcK Oct 12 '11 at 19:12

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