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If I had something like:

App = {
    editingMode: function ()
    {
        function setEditingMode(entityID) {
            $('#editingMode').val('1');
            $.ajax({
                type: "POST",
                url: "/Organisations/Manage/LockEntity/",
                data: "entityID=" + entityID
            });
        }
        function setEditingModeOff(entityID) {
            if ($("#myform").valid() == true)
            {
                $('#editingMode').val('0');
                $.ajax({
                    type: "POST",
                    url: "/Organisations/Manage/UnlockEntity/",
                    data: "entityID=" + entityID
                });
            }
        }
    }
};

How would I run one of the inner functions?

App.editingMode(); but then what would I do to get at the setEditingMode ??

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2  
AFAIK those functions are effectively private, you can't. –  Jakub Hampl Oct 10 '11 at 11:44

2 Answers 2

You would need to return a reference to one or otherwise make it accessible from outside of the function, for example, attaching it to window (effectively making it a global) or the App object.

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Hmm makes me wonder why bother with Namespacing? –  Cameron Oct 10 '11 at 11:46
    
@Cameron Namespacing is still a good idea. It's better to only have App global then have dozens of global functions, objects, etc. –  alex Oct 10 '11 at 11:48

You can use a different structure to accomplish what you want. I don't know if it would break something else you are using, so I'll just give you an example. I'm not sure this is the actual solution, please take a look and tell me if that's not what you need. If you use:

 var App = {
                editingMode:
                {
                    setEditingMode: function(entityID) {
                        $('#editingMode').val('1');
                        $.ajax({
                            type: "POST",
                            url: "/Organisations/Manage/LockEntity/",
                            data: "entityID=" + entityID
                        });
                    },
                    setEditingModeOff: function(entityID) {
                        if ($("#myform").valid() == true)
                        {
                            $('#editingMode').val('0');
                            $.ajax({
                                type: "POST",
                                url: "/Organisations/Manage/UnlockEntity/",
                                data: "entityID=" + entityID
                            });
                        }
                    }
                }
            };

you can call editingMode's methods like this:

App.editingMode.setEditingModeOff(1);

Notice that they will still be encapsulated within App, you don't necessarily move them to the global scope.

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I guess that would work. But it almost makes me wonder why bother with the namespacing at all :/ –  Cameron Oct 10 '11 at 11:57
1  
It's always useful, I don't think I can list the benefits in the number of characters allowed in a comment. When you have a large project with dozens of objects with dozens of methods, etc. you'll appreciate namespacing :) –  Nikoloff Oct 10 '11 at 12:01

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