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This piece of code, test.py:

if 1:
   print "foo"
print "bar"

can be succesfully executed with execfile("test.py") or python test.py, but when one tries to copy-paste it into python interpreter:

File "<stdin>", line 3
print "bar"
        ^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax

Why is it so? Can interpreter by configured in such a way that it would read copy-pasted text succesfully? I guess that may affect typing in the interpreter, but that's ok for me.

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+1: I've been caught out by missing the line break after a block many times and never found a satisfactory explanation as to why it's different to a non-interactive session. –  Johnsyweb Oct 10 '11 at 12:07
    
that's the thing, actually this is my style of working with python right now, and because of this i need to put empty lines in the source files which i'm working on (and testing via copy-paste)... that's irritating –  pms Oct 10 '11 at 12:43
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3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Indentation is probably lost or broken.

Have a look at IPython -- it's enhanced python interpreter with many convenient features. One of them is a magic function %paste that allows you to paste multiple lines of code.

It also has tab-completion, auto-indentation.. and many more. Have a look at their site.


Using %paste in ipython:

enter image description here

And copy-and-paste stuff is one of the things fixed in the qt console, here's using a plain old copy-and-paste of your code block "just works" in the new ipython qtconsole:

enter image description here

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1  
ipython, good as it is, barfs on this sample too: SyntaxError: invalid syntax. Try it! –  Johnsyweb Oct 10 '11 at 12:06
    
@Johnsyweb I'm at windows ATM and %paste doesn't seem to work at all (something with tkinter_clipboard). So I can't really try it. But the %cpaste mentioned in @naufraghi's answer works fine even with this example. –  rplnt Oct 10 '11 at 12:16
    
@Johnsyweb Works for me, see examples added in my edit. However, I have a pretty recent build of ipython and I'm aware this is something that was definitely b0rked in the past. –  wim Oct 10 '11 at 14:21
1  
Please note that this does not "allow you to paste", this is apparently supposed to grab code from the selection (or maybe the clipboard) and run it automagically, while %cpaste, suggested in another answer, effectively allows you to paste manually. –  njsg Mar 25 '12 at 10:20
    
For multi-line paste, there is also DreamPie for Linux and Windows. –  otterb Nov 20 '12 at 21:40
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I don't know any trick for the standard command prompt, but I can suggest you a more advanced interpreter like IPython that has a special syntax for multi-line paste:

In [1]: %cpaste
Pasting code; enter '--' alone on the line to stop.
:for c in range(3):
:    print c
:
:--
0
1
2

Another option is the bpython interpreter that has an automatic paste mode (if you are typing too fast to be an human):

>>> for c in range(3):
...     print c
... 
0
1
2
>>> 
 <C-r> Rewind  <C-s> Save  <F8> Pastebin  <F9> Pager  <F2> Show Source 
share|improve this answer
    
+1: I did not know about %cpaste! –  Johnsyweb Oct 10 '11 at 12:18
    
Does not work for the example above, perhaps for the reason pointed by @Johnsyweb –  naufraghi Oct 10 '11 at 12:37
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Continuation lines are needed when entering a multi-line construct. --Interactive mode, The Python Tutorial

So you need to enter:

if 1:
   print "foo"

print "bar"

I've yet to find a suitable explanation as to why it's different to a non-interactive session, alas.

share|improve this answer
    
yes, i've noticed this, but copy-paste testing of my sources is my python work-style right now and this thing imposes on me to put redundant empty lines everywhere... –  pms Oct 10 '11 at 12:46
1  
Have you considered unit testing instead? –  Johnsyweb Oct 10 '11 at 15:05
1  
It's curious, as — IMHO — one would expect text run using shebang lines to run sligthlty in the same way as if it were sent to the stdin of the interpreter. –  njsg Mar 25 '12 at 10:22
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