Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is this the only way of passing a List to a method and editing that List, without modifying the original List?

class CopyTest1
{
    List<int> _myList = new List<int>();
    public CopyTest1(List<int> l)
    {
        foreach (int num in l)
        {
            _myList.Add(num);
        }
        _myList.RemoveAt(0); // no effect on original List
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
No it isn't the only way. –  Will Oct 10 '11 at 12:39
    
Is this a way of passing a List to a method and editing that List, without modifying the original List? –  Bastardo Oct 10 '11 at 12:39
    
What's the question? –  Amittai Shapira Oct 10 '11 at 12:40
    
Yes - that is my question –  Paligulus Oct 10 '11 at 12:40

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

duplicate the list:

_myLocalList = new List<int>(_myList);

and perform the operations on the local list.

share|improve this answer

Use AsReadOnly for this:

class CopyTest1
{
    List<int> _myList = new List<int>();
    public CopyTest1(IList<int> l)
    {
        foreach (int num in l)
        {
            _myList.Add(num);
        }
        _myList.RemoveAt(0); // no effect on original List
    }
}

And call it via CopyTest1(yourList.AsReadOnly()) .

share|improve this answer

Clone objects in the list to other list and work on this copy

static class Extensions
{
        public static IList<T> Clone<T>(this IList<T> listToClone) where T: ICloneable
        {
                return listToClone.Select(item => (T)item.Clone()).ToList();
        }
}
share|improve this answer

There is another way. You can use the copy constructor of List<T>:

List<int> _myList;
public CopyTest1(List<int> l)
{
    _myList = new List<int>(l);
}
share|improve this answer

When you pass a list to a method you pass a pointer to said list, that's why your changing the 'original' list when you modify it inside your method. If you instead want to modify a copy of the list you just need to make one. In the code that calls CopyTest1 you can create a new list based on your original list:

public void CallsCopyTest1()
{
    var originalList = new List<int>();
    var newList = new List<int>(originalList);
    var copyTest = new CopyTest1(newList); //Modifies newList not originalList
}
class CopyTest1
{
    List<int> _myList = new List<int>();
    public CopyTest1(List<int> l)
    {
        foreach (int num in l)
        {
            _myList.Add(num);
        }
        _myList.RemoveAt(0); // no effect on original List
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
If the callers forgets to create a copy then they will get unexpected behaviour - I would prefer for the class\method to handle it –  Paligulus Oct 10 '11 at 12:47
    
That depends what the purpose of the class is, is it do modify a collection or to create a copy of a collection and modify it? The example is a bit contrived and I don't think it's obvious exactly what you wanted. –  Simon Stender Boisen Oct 10 '11 at 12:52

You can pass an object by reference doing the following:

public static void ReferenceMethod(ref List<T> myParam) {
    ...
} 

EDIT: The question has now been clarified, the OP was after a way not to alter the original list.

share|improve this answer
    
and in any case it is not necessary to pass it as ref to alter the original list -- ref allows you to change the reference in the caller's scope to point to another object, something that is highly unlikely to be useful –  newacct Oct 11 '11 at 4:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.