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If I have this:

int a = 2;
int b = 4;
int &ref = a;

How can I make ref refer to b after this code?
Thank you!

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up vote 38 down vote accepted

This is not possible, and that's by design. References cannot be rebound.

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With C++11 there is std::refrence_wrapper.

#include <functional>

int main() {
  int a = 2;
  int b = 4;
  std::reference_wrapper<int> ref = std::ref(a);
  //auto ref = std::ref(a); <- Would also work
  ref = std::ref(b);
}

This is also useful for storing references in containers.

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You can't reassign a reference, but if you're looking for something that would provide similar abilities to this you can do a pointer instead.

int a = 2;
int b = 4;
int* ptr = &a;  //ptr points to memory location of a.
int* ptr = &b;  //ptr points to memory location of b now.

You can get or set the value within pointer with:

*ptr = 5;     //set
int c = *ptr; //get
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That's not possible in the way you want. C++ just doesn't let you rebind what a reference points to.

However if you want to use trickery you can almost simulate it with a new scope (NEVER do this in a real program):

int a = 2;
int b = 4;
int &ref = a;

{
    int& ref = b; // Shadows the original ref so everything inside this { } refers to `ref` as `b` now.
}
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almost -1 worthy – ThomasMcLeod Oct 22 '13 at 11:37

You cannot reassign a reference.

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Although its a bad idea as it defeats the purpose of using references, it is possible to change the reference directly

const_cast< int& >(ref)=b;
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2  
It is funny how people +1 wrong solution. This code will change variable where ref points to, not reference itself – Slava May 21 '15 at 14:12
    
Nothing longer surpises me on Exchange sites :D – DarioOO Jun 22 '15 at 16:08

This is possible. Because under the hood, reference is a pointer. The following code will print "hello world"

#include "stdlib.h"
#include "stdio.h"
#include <string>

using namespace std;

class ReferenceChange
{
public:
    size_t otherVariable;
    string& ref;

    ReferenceChange() : ref(*((string*)NULL)) {}

    void setRef(string& str) {
        *(&this->otherVariable + 1) = (size_t)&str;
    }
};

void main()
{
    string a("hello");
    string b("world");

    ReferenceChange rc;

    rc.setRef(a);
    printf("%s ", rc.ref.c_str());

    rc.setRef(b);
    printf("%s\n", rc.ref.c_str());
}
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Whatever effect you have on UB does not mean it "works" – Slava May 21 '15 at 14:08

You can make a reference wrapper very easy using the placement new:

template< class T >
class RefWrapper
{
public:
    RefWrapper( T& v ) : m_v( v ){}

    operator T&(){ return m_v; }
    T& operator=( const T& a ){ m_v = a; return m_v;}
    //...... //
    void remap( T& v )
    {
        //re-map  reference
        new (this) RefWrapper(v);
    }

private:
    T& m_v;
};


 int32 a = 0;
 int32 b = 0;
 RefWrapper< int > r( a );

 r = 1; // a = 1 now
 r.remap( b );
 r = 2; // b = 2 now
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2  
This answer is much more complicated than necessary - the question was very simple and could be answered with one-liner. – lukelazarovic Mar 28 '14 at 10:53

Formally speaking, that is impossible as it is forbidden by design. Arbitrarily speaking, that is possible.

A references is stored as a pointer, so you can always change where it points to as long as you know how to get its address. Similarly, you can also change the value of const variables, const member variables or even private member variables when you don't have access to.

For example, the following code has changed class A's const private member reference:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class A{
private:
    const int &i1;
public:
    A(int &a):i1(a){}
    int geti(){return i1;}
    int *getip(){return (int*)&i1;}
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
    int i=5, j=10;
    A a(i);
    cout << "before change:" << endl;
    cout << "&a.i1=" << a.getip() << " &i=" << &i << " &j="<< &j << endl;
    cout << "i=" << i << " j=" <<j<< " a.i1=" << a.geti() << endl;
    i=6; cout << "setting i to 6" << endl;
    cout << "i=" << i << " j=" <<j<< " a.i1=" << a.geti() << endl;

    *(int**)&a = &j; // the key step that changes A's member reference

    cout << endl << "after change:" << endl;
    cout << "&a.i1=" << a.getip() << " &i=" << &i << " &j="<< &j << endl;
    cout << "i=" << i << " j=" <<j<< " a.i1=" << a.geti() << endl;
    j=11; cout << "setting j to 11" << endl;
    cout << "i=" << i << " j=" <<j<< " a.i1=" << a.geti() << endl;
    return  0;
}

Program output:

before change:
&a.i1=0x7fff1b624140 &i=0x7fff1b624140 &j=0x7fff1b624150
i=5 j=10 a.i1=5
setting i to 6
i=6 j=10 a.i1=6

after change:
&a.i1=0x7fff1b624150 &i=0x7fff1b624140 &j=0x7fff1b624150
i=6 j=10 a.i1=10
setting j to 11
i=6 j=11 a.i1=11

As you can see that a.i1 initially points to i, after the change, it points to j.

However, doing so is considered as dangerous and thus unrecommended, because it defeats the original purpose of data encapsulation and OOP. It is more like memory address hacking.

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