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From Java 1.6 Collection Framework documentation:

Collections that do not support any modification operations (such as add, remove and clear) are referred to as unmodifiable. [...] Collections that additionally guarantee that no change in the Collection object will ever be visible are referred to as immutable.

The second criteria confuses me a bit. Given the first collection is unmodifiable, and assuming that the original collection reference has been disposed away, what are the changes that are referred to in the second line? Is it referring to the changes in the elements held in the collection ie the state of the elements?

Second question:
For a collection to be immutable, how does one go about providing the additional guarentees specified? If the state of an element in the collection is updated by a thread, is it sufficient for immutability that those updates in the state are not visible on the thread holding the immutable collection?

Edit : (highlighting the focus of second question) :

For a collection to be immutable, how does one go about providing the additional guarentees specified?

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In general (especially in functional languages), immutable (aka persistent) collection may change in sense that you can get new state of this collection, but at the same time old state will be still available from other links. For example, newCol = oldCol.add("element") will produce new collection that is copy of old one with 1 more element, and all references to the oldCol will still point to the same unchanged old collection. –  ffriend Oct 10 '11 at 13:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 40 down vote accepted

Unmodifiable collections are usually read-only views (wrappers) of other collections. You can't add, remove or clear them, but the underlying collection can change.

Immutable collections can't be changed at all - they don't wrap another collection - they have their own elements.

Here's a quote from guava's ImmutableList

Unlike Collections.unmodifiableList(java.util.List<? extends T>), which is a view of a separate collection that can still change, an instance of ImmutableList contains its own private data and will never change.

So, basically, in order to get an immutable collection out of a mutable one, you have to copy its elements to the new collection, and disallow all operations.

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Can you comment on my edit please ? –  Bhaskar Oct 10 '11 at 14:53
    
@Bhaskar - see my last paragraph. –  Bozho Oct 10 '11 at 14:56
    
if the collection that is wrapped inside another unmodifiable collection does not have any other references to it , then is the unmodifiable collection's bahaviour exactly same to an immutable collection ? –  Bhaskar Oct 10 '11 at 15:11
    
yes, but you can't be sure –  Bozho Oct 10 '11 at 15:27
    
@Bozho, If reference to backing collection is not provided, and only unmodifable collection wrapper reference is provided, then there is no way you can change it. Then why do you say "You can't be sure"? Does it point out to a scenario where some thread or somehow it gets modified because backing collection is modifiable? –  AKS Aug 20 '13 at 17:25

The difference is that you can't have a reference to an immutable collection which allows changes. Unmodifiable collections are unmodifiable through that reference, but some other object may point to the same data through which it can be changed.

e.g.

List<String> strings = new ArrayList<String>();
List<String> unmodifiable = Collections.unmodifiableList(strings);
unmodifiable.add("New string"); // will fail at runtime
strings.add("Aha!"); // will succeed
System.out.println(unmodifiable);
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what various causes, if any ,can bring a change in a collection that is unmodifiable , provided the original collection reference is not used to modify the underlying collection ? –  Bhaskar Oct 10 '11 at 14:52

I believe the point here is that even if a collection is Unmodifiable, that does not ensure that it cannot change. Take for example a collection that evicts elements if they are too old. Unmodifiable just means that the object holding the reference cannot change it, not that it cannot change. A true example of this is Collections.unmodifiableList method. It returns an unmodifiable view of a List. The the List reference that was passed into this method is still modifiable and so the list can be modified by any holder of the reference that was passed. This can result in ConcurrentModificationExceptions and other bad things.

Immutable, mean that in no way can the collection be changed.

Second question: An Immutable collection does not mean that the objects contained in the collection will not change, just that collection will not change in the number and composition of objects that it holds. In other words, the collection's list of references will not change. That does not mean that the internals of the object being referenced cannot change.

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Good one!! So if I create a wrapper over Unmodifiable Collection and make modifiable collection reference as private then i can be sure that it is immutable. right? –  AKS Aug 20 '13 at 17:29
    
If I understand you question, then the answer is no. Wrapping the Unmodifiable does nothing to protect it from having the collection passed to unmodifiableList modified. If you want to do this use ImmutableList. –  John B Aug 20 '13 at 17:52
Collection<String> c1 = new ArrayList<String>();
c1.add("foo");
Collection<String> c2 = Collection.unmodifiableList(c1);

c1 is mutable (i.e. neither unmodifiable nor immutable).
c2 is unmodifiable: it can't be changed itself, but if later on I change c1 then that change will be visible in c2.

This is because c2 is simply a wrapper around c1 and not really an independent copy. Guava provides the ImmutableList interface and some implementations. Those work by actually creating a copy of the input (unless the input is an immutable collection on its own).

Regarding your second question:

The mutability/immutability of a collectoin does not depend on the mutability/immutability of the objects contained therein. Modifying an object contained in a collection does not count as a "modification of the collection" for this description. Of course if you need a immutable collection, you usually also want it to contain immutable objects.

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c2 is actually immutable :) –  John Vint Oct 10 '11 at 13:36
1  
@John: no, it's not. At least not according to the definition quoted by the OP. –  Joachim Sauer Oct 10 '11 at 13:39
    
@JohnVint , really ? I would not think so, because using c1 , I can still add elements into it , and this addition will be visible to c2. Does that not mean its not immutable ? –  Bhaskar Oct 10 '11 at 13:42
1  
@Vint: "if c1 does not escape" is not a consideration that's distinguished anywhere in the specification. In my opinion, if you can use the collection in a way that makes it non-immutable, then you should always consider it non-immutable. –  Joachim Sauer Oct 10 '11 at 14:22
1  
Let me quote the definition: "Collections that additionally guarantee ..." (emphasis mine). Collection.unmodifiableList() can't guarantee that, because it can't guarantee that its argument doesn't escape. Guava ImmutableList.of always produces an immutable List, even if you let its arguments escape. –  Joachim Sauer Oct 10 '11 at 14:25

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