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I have a list of sites that represent spam links:

List<String> bannedSites = ["spam1.com", "spam2.com", "spam3.com"];

Is there a regex way of removing links matching these banned sites from this text:

Dear Arezzo,
Please check out my website at spam1.com or http://www.spam1.com 
or http://spam1.com or spam1 dot com to win millions of dollars in prizes.
Thank you.
Big Spammer

Notice the link may have multiple URL formats which aioobe's solution does a good job of identifying:

    String input = "Dear Arezzo,\n"
        + "Please check out my website at spam1.com or http://www.spam1.com" 
        + "or http://spam1.com or spam1 dot com to win millions of dollars in prizes."
        + "Thank you.";

    List<String> bannedSites = Arrays.asList("spam1.com", "spam2.com", "spam3.com");

    StringBuilder re = new StringBuilder();
    for (String bannedSite : bannedSites) {
        if (re.length() > 0)
            re.append("|");
        re.append(String.format("http://(www\\.)?%s\\S*|%1$s",
                                Pattern.quote(bannedSite)));
    }

    System.out.println(input.replaceAll(re.toString(), "LINK REMOVED"));

But while the code above works great for the URL formats spam1.com or http://www.spam1.com or http://spam1.com, it misses the multiple text formats:

How can I modify the regex to target text formats such as these?

spam1 dot com
spam1[.com]
spam1 .com
spam1 . com

The idea is to produce a result like this:

Dear Arezzo,
Please check out my website at [LINK REMOVED] or [LINK REMOVED] 
or [LINK REMOVED] or [LINK REMOVED] to win millions of dollars in prizes.
Thank you.
Big Spammer

As I remarked in the comments below, I probably don't need to ban the whole string spam1 dot com. If I can efface just the spam1 part so that it becomes: [LINK REMOVED] dot com - that would do the job.

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4  
It's an uphill battle for sure. You ban spam dot com, they write spam ddot com. Perhaps this is not the right approach to the problem? –  Tim Pietzcker Oct 10 '11 at 14:21
    
I probably don't need to ban the whole string spam dot com. If I can efface just the spam part so that it becomes: [LINK REMOVED] dot com - that would work just as well. –  arezzo Oct 10 '11 at 14:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's a start for you.

import java.util.*;
import java.util.regex.Pattern;

class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        String input = "Dear Arezzo,\n"
            + "Please check out my website at spam1.com "
            + "or http://www.spam1.com or http://spam1.com or " 
            + "spam1 dot com to win millions of dollars in prizes.\n"
            + "Thank you.";

        List<String> bannedSites = Arrays.asList("spam1", "spam2", "spam3");

        StringBuilder re = new StringBuilder();
        for (String bannedSite : bannedSites) {
            if (re.length() > 0)
                re.append("|");
            String quotedSite = Pattern.quote(bannedSite);
            re.append("https?://(www\\.)?" + quotedSite + "\\S*");
            re.append("|" + quotedSite + "\\s*(dot|\\.)?\\s*(com|net|org)");
            //re.append("|" ... your variation here);
        }

        System.out.println(input.replaceAll(re.toString(), "LINK REMOVED"));
    }
}

Output:

Dear Arezzo,

Please check out my website at LINK REMOVED or LINK REMOVED or LINK REMOVED or LINK REMOVED to win millions of dollars in prizes. Thank you.

Extend the regular expression as needed.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow. This looks perfect. Thanks, man. Testing this now. –  arezzo Oct 10 '11 at 13:28
    
No problem, you're welcome :-) –  aioobe Oct 10 '11 at 13:30
    
It works great for the URL formats but doesn't pick up the text formats. Any idea how to modify the regex to work for those too? –  arezzo Oct 10 '11 at 14:01
    
Elaborated the answer a bit for you (due to your nice accept-rate ;-) –  aioobe Oct 10 '11 at 18:13

I will suggest to use TRIE (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trie) DS to store the blacklist of websites. Now while reading the website you can do the comparison and remove the banned sites. It will be efficient than regex as using regex you will be searching for each spam website string in the input text.

share|improve this answer
    
You misunderstand. The text is already stored as a simple String. I just need to sanitize the String using Regex. –  arezzo Oct 10 '11 at 13:25
    
Please correct me if I am wrong. But you need to parse the given simple string to sanitize it. Using regex directly or indirectly (behind the APIs) you will end up comparing each word in input string with each of the regex patterns which will quite large for large text inputs. Using trie will actually optimize this whole process in big way –  saury Oct 10 '11 at 17:33

Using regular expressions for this purpose could prove a performance bottle neck as the list of spammed sites, total number of messages processed and message size increases.

The regular expression in the following test code works, but I would only use it after thorough testing and making all possible performance improvements.

final String[] spam = new String[] {"spam1.com", "spam2.net"};
System.out.println("***** SPAM SITES *****\n" + Arrays.toString(spam)
        + "\n");
final StringBuilder patternBuilder = new StringBuilder();
patternBuilder.append("(?i)(?:(?:f|ht)tps?://)?(?:\\S*?)(");
for (final String s : spam) {
    patternBuilder
            .append("(?:\\[|\\])?"
                    + s.replaceAll("\\.",
                            "\\\\s*(?:\\\\[|\\\\])?\\\\s*(?:\\\\.|dot)\\\\s*(?:\\\\[|\\\\])?\\\\s*")
                    + "\\s*(?:\\[|\\])?").append("|");
}
patternBuilder.setLength(patternBuilder.length() - 1);
patternBuilder.append(")(?:/\\S*)?(?=\\s|$)");
final String ps = patternBuilder.toString();
final String psLong = ps;
System.out.println("***** PATTERN *****\n" + psLong + "\n");
final Pattern p = Pattern.compile(ps);
for (String s : new String[] {"http://www.spam1.com",
        "http://spam2.net", "www.spam1.com", "spam1 dot com",
        "spam1[.com]", "spam1 .com", "spam2 . net", "no links here"})
{
    final Matcher m = p.matcher(s);
    if (m.matches()) {
        System.out.println("Success: " + s);
    } else {
        System.out.println("Fail: " + s);
    }
}
final String message =
        "Dear Arezzo,\nPlease check out my website at spam1.com or http://www.spam1.com \nor http://spam1.com or spam1 dot com to win millions of dollars in prizes.\nThank you.\nBig Spammer\n";
final Matcher m = p.matcher(message);
System.out.println("\n\n***** ORIGINAL MESSAGE *****\n" + message
        + "\n\n***** REPLACED LINKS *****\n"
        + m.replaceAll("[LINK REMOVED]"));

Which outputs:

***** SPAM SITES *****
[spam1.com, spam2.net]

***** PATTERN *****
(?i)(?:(?:f|ht)tps?://)?(?:\S*?)((?:\[|\])?spam1\s*(?:\[|\])?\s*(?:\.|dot)\s*(?:\[|\])?\s*com\s*(?:\[|\])?|(?:\[|\])?spam2\s*(?:\[|\])?\s*(?:\.|dot)\s*(?:\[|\])?\s*net\s*(?:\[|\])?)(?:/\S*)?(?=\s|$)

Success: http://www.spam1.com
Success: http://spam2.net
Success: www.spam1.com
Success: spam1 dot com
Success: spam1[.com]
Success: spam1 .com
Success: spam2 . net
Fail: no links here


***** ORIGINAL MESSAGE *****
Dear Arezzo,
Please check out my website at spam1.com or http://www.spam1.com 
or http://spam1.com or spam1 dot com to win millions of dollars in prizes.
Thank you.
Big Spammer


***** REPLACED LINKS *****
Dear Arezzo,
Please check out my website at [LINK REMOVED] or [LINK REMOVED]
or [LINK REMOVED] or [LINK REMOVED] to win millions of dollars in prizes.
Thank you.
Big Spammer
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