Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can someone help me to bring this code working? I have several select fields and I only want the last one in my variable.

variable = browser.elements_by_xpath('//div[@class="nested-field"]//select[last()]

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Provide sample input. –  Kirill Polishchuk Oct 10 '11 at 13:40

2 Answers 2

This is a FAQ: The [] operator in XPath has higher precedence (priority) than the // pseudo-operator. This is why brackets must be used to change the default operator priorities. There are at least several similar questions with good explanations -- search for them and read and understand.

Instead of:

//div[@class="nested-field"]//select[last()] 

Use:

(//div[@class="nested-field"]//select)[last()] 
share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand why //div[@class="nested-field"]//select would match anything. –  pguardiario Oct 11 '11 at 7:51
    
@pguardiario: Not "match" but "select". //div[@class="nested-field"]//select selects any select element that is a descendent of any div element, whose class attribute has the value of "nested-field" . –  Dimitre Novatchev Oct 11 '11 at 12:30
    
I guess my question is why is it //select instead of /select? –  pguardiario Oct 12 '11 at 1:29
1  
@pguardiario: someElement/select selects only the children (named select) of someElement. On the other side, someElement//select selects any descendant (child, grandchild, grand-grand-child, ..., etc.) named select. –  Dimitre Novatchev Oct 12 '11 at 4:11
    
Got it. Thanks Dimitre –  pguardiario Oct 12 '11 at 9:29

is the class attribute an exact match? if the mark up is like this

<div class="nested-field other">
...

then you'll have to either match by the exact class or use xpath contains.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.