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I can't find a way to inject parameters in this scenario:

class Top
{
    private ISome some;
    public Top()
    {
        some = CreateSome(localRuntimeVariable);
    }

    //I need to pass "some" instance as a InjectionParameter to Child constructor
    [Dependency]
    public Child Child {get;set;}
}
class Child
{
    //I need to inject ISome but it can only be constructed in Top
    public Child(ISome some, Foo foo)
    {
    }
}
public class Usage
{
    private void Top GetTop(Foo foo)
    {
        return unity.Resolve<Top>(new DependencyOverride<Foo>(foo));
        //I expect: Top.Constuctor called and 'some' is assigned;
        //          Top.Child property beeing resolved: Child.Constructor called
        //          'foo' instance to be taken from unity.Resolve<Top>(new DependencyOverride<Foo>(foo));
        //          'some' instance to be taken from Top.some, but how to tell unity to inject it?
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Where is the resolve statement? What references are known when Resolve is invoked? –  PVitt Oct 11 '11 at 6:59
    
Yes, I saw this line. But in which context is this line invoked? Please put the whole method. What references are available when resolve is invoked? –  PVitt Oct 11 '11 at 9:51
    
@PVitt updated question. –  Alex Burtsev Oct 11 '11 at 14:55
    
Without knowing exactly what your classes are doing, Top creating its own ISome instance might be a violation of the Single Responsibility Principal. I feel like ISome should be injected into Top as well. Perhaps you can use a factory and the InjectionFactory class in Unity to do this somehow? –  CodingWithSpike Oct 11 '11 at 15:42

2 Answers 2

I know this question is old but I recently had a situation that was similar to this (I think):

In my situation the "Top" class was something that was constructed through the dependency resolver by the framework. Then the "Context" I needed was given to the "Top" instance by the framework after construction and injection was complete. Like you, I needed this "Context" to be injectable down the dependency chain but there was no access to this value until after construction and injection was complete.

class Top 
{
    // This is set by the framework after injection is complete
    public ISome Context { get; set; } 

    [Dependency]
    public IService Child { get; set; }
}

class Child : IService 
{
    private ISome _context;

    // This needs to somehow get ISome after being constructed
    // and injected into "Top"
    public Child(ISome context) { _context = context; }
}

The solution I ended up using was creating a custom IDependencyResolver (used by the framework) that would inject a resolver for this context using a DependencyOverride in the UnityContainer.Resolve call. This version of the solution is simplified to communicate the idea better. You may want to abstract the DependencyResolver solution a bit.

class MyDependencyResolver : IDependencyResolver
{
    public IUnityContainer Container { get; private set; }

    public MyDependencyResolver(IUnityContainer container) { Container = container; }

    public override object GetService(Type serviceType)
    {
        if (typeof(Top).IsAssignableFrom(serviceType)) {
            // The DependencyOverride will cause this injection chain
            // to receive this instance of the IContextResolver
            var resolver = new ContextResolver();
            var dOverride = new DependencyOverride(typeof(IContextResolver), resolver);
            var top = Container.Resolve(serviceType, dOverride);
            resolver.Init(() => top.Context);
            return top;
        }
        return Container.Resolve(serviceType);
    }
}

class ContextResolver : IContextResolver 
{
    public delegate ISome ResolverDelegate();

    private ResolverDelegate _resolver;

    public ISome Resolve()
    {
        return _resolver == null ? null : _resolver();
    }

    public void Init(ResolverDelegate resolver) { _resolver = resolver; }
}

Of course the constructor dependency for "Child" will need to be updated

class Child : IService
{
    private IContextResolver _context;

    public Child(IContextResolver context) { _context = context; }
}

As a disclaimer, I am writing this from memory so please excuse any inaccuracies. I hope I have clearly demonstrated the concept of the solution.

A limitation to this approach is that the context will not be available until after construction is complete. Your consumers will have to be aware of this. I believe I had an "IsReady" method on the ContextResolver.

share|improve this answer
class Top
{
    public Top( Foo foo, IUnityContainer container )
    {
        some = CreateSome(localRuntimeVariable);
        Child = container.Resolve<Child>(new ParameterOverride("some" some),
            new ParameterOverride("Foo", foo));
    }

    public Child Child {get;private set;}
}

class Child
{
    public Child(ISome some, Foo foo)
    {
    }
}

Now you can resolve an instance of top using unity.Resolve<Top>(new ParameterOverride("Foo", foo))

The class Usage isn't needed. GetTop(Foo foo) is just syntactic sugar for unity.Resolve<Top>(new DependencyOverride<Foo>(foo))

share|improve this answer
    
well I did exectly as you wrote, but this violates the design principle of our application: DI container should only be used at composition root (app entry point), and having DI container as parameter in constuctor is considered a code smell in our team. –  Alex Burtsev Oct 12 '11 at 4:43
    
And how does your team solve your problem? –  PVitt Oct 12 '11 at 7:44
    
They don't. I wouldn't ask a question here of someone of my team knew how to solve this. –  Alex Burtsev Oct 12 '11 at 8:52
    
Sorry, that was sarcastic question. I would ask your team. If they forbid using a possible solution they have to have a way to solve the problem or they have to review their forbidance. Besides that it can be that your code needs a refactoring. You don't provide that much details than I can form an opinion of that, but your design feels a bit uncommon. –  PVitt Oct 12 '11 at 9:19
    
Well, then I way conclude that, you can't pass parameters to properties mark as dependencies, from the class they are declared in. And I need to redesign my code. –  Alex Burtsev Oct 12 '11 at 9:30

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