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I have XML which looks like this when simplified:

node_set = Nokogiri::XML('
<PARENT>
   <SOME_TAG>12:12:1222</SOME_TAG>
   <HOLY_TAG>12:12:1222</HOLY_TAG>
   <MAJOR_TAG>12:12:1222</MAJOR_TAG>
   <FOO_FOO>12:12:1222</FOO_FOO>
</PARENT>'
)

All I know is only how to write a regexp for this like:

(\d+):(\d+):(\d+)

I read some articles for regexp matching on the official site, but there's no answer how to do it. Only the mechanism how to invoke user functions into the xpath method.

How could I can get all these tags without knowing it's name by the regexp?

share|improve this question
4  
To clarify: You want to find all tags, no matter what their name is, as long as the text that they contain can be matched by a certain regex? –  Tim Pietzcker Oct 10 '11 at 14:49
3  
Please provide an example of what should be matched from your example text -- SOME_TAG, HOLY_TAG, MAJOR_TAG, and FOO_FOO? Please also add an example of a node that should NOT be matched, but might be close. –  Code Jockey Oct 10 '11 at 15:34
    
Tim, Code, I need to get only that tags, which text fits on the regexp, from bracket < to bracket > –  Flextra Oct 11 '11 at 7:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Nokogiri does not support the XPath 2.0 matches function, so you'll need to use Ruby to perform the regex:

hits = node_set.xpath("//text()").grep(/\d+:\d+:\d+/).map(&:parent)
p hits.map(&:name)
#=> ["SOME_TAG", "HOLY_TAG", "MAJOR_TAG", "FOO_FOO"]

Described:

  1. Find all text nodes throughout the document.
  2. Reduce the list to only those that match the regex desired.
  3. Map the list to the parent elements of each text node.

The Enumerable#grep method is shorthand for .select{ |text| regex === text }.

Alternatively, note that you can define your own custom XPath functions in Nokogiri that call back to Ruby, so you could pretend to be using XPath 2.0 matches:

module FindWithRegex
  def self.matches(nodes,pattern,flags=nil)
    nodes.grep(Regexp.new(pattern,flags))
  end
end

hits = node_set.xpath('//*[matches(text(),"\d+:\d+:\d+")]',FindWithRegex)
p hits.map(&:name)
#=> ["SOME_TAG", "HOLY_TAG", "MAJOR_TAG", "FOO_FOO"]

However, due to the fact that this is re-called for each found node (and thus re-creating a new regexp from a string each time) it's not nearly as efficient:

require 'benchmark'
Benchmark.bm(15) do |x|
  N = 10000
  x.report('grep and map'){ N.times{
    node_set.xpath("//text()").grep(/\d+:\d+:\d+/).map(&:parent)
  }}
  x.report('custom function'){ N.times{
    node_set.xpath('//*[matches(text(),"\d+:\d+:\d+")]',FindWithRegex)
  }}
end

#=>                      user     system      total        real
#=> grep and map     0.437000   0.016000   0.453000 (  0.442044)
#=> custom function  1.653000   0.031000   1.684000 (  1.694170)

You can speed it up by caching the Regex:

module FindWithRegex
  REs = {}
  def self.matches(nodes,pattern,flags=nil)
    nodes.grep(REs[pattern] ||= Regexp.new(pattern,flags))
  end
end

#=>                      user     system      total        real
#=> grep and map     0.437000   0.016000   0.453000 (  0.442044)
#=> cached regex     0.905000   0.000000   0.905000 (  0.896090)
share|improve this answer
    
My god, thank you very much indeed for your answer and detailed explaination. Worked perfectly. –  Flextra Oct 11 '11 at 7:53

Here is a pure XPath 1.0 solution. Although there is no native RegEx facility in XPath 1.0, this is still possible to achieve using the standard XPath 1.0 functions substring-before(), substring-after(), and translate():

/*/*[not(translate(substring-before(.,':'),
                   '0123456789',
                    ''
                    )
         )
   and
     not(translate
           (substring-before(substring-after(.,':'),
                             ':'
                             ),
           '0123456789',
           ''
           )
          )
   and
     not(translate
           (substring-after(substring-after(.,':'),
                             ':'
                             ),
           '0123456789',
           ''
           )
          )
    ]

XSLT - based verification:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
     <xsl:copy-of select=
     "    /*/*[not(translate(substring-before(.,':'),
                       '0123456789',
                        ''
                        )
             )
       and
         not(translate
               (substring-before(substring-after(.,':'),
                                 ':'
                                 ),
               '0123456789',
               ''
               )
              )
       and
         not(translate
               (substring-after(substring-after(.,':'),
                                 ':'
                                 ),
               '0123456789',
               ''
               )
              )
        ]
"/>
 </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

This XSLT transformation just selects using the above expression and outputs the selected nodes. When applied on this XML document (the provided one with added "invalid" elements):

<PARENT>
   <SOME_TAG>12:12:1222</SOME_TAG>
   <SOME_TAG2>12a:12:1222</SOME_TAG2>
   <HOLY_TAG>12:12:1222</HOLY_TAG>
   <HOLY_TAG2>12:12b:1222</HOLY_TAG2>
   <MAJOR_TAG>12:12:1222</MAJOR_TAG>
   <MAJOR_TAG2>12:12:1222c</MAJOR_TAG2>
   <FOO_FOO>12:12:1222</FOO_FOO>
</PARENT>

the wanted, correctly selected nodes are output:

<SOME_TAG>12:12:1222</SOME_TAG>
<HOLY_TAG>12:12:1222</HOLY_TAG>
<MAJOR_TAG>12:12:1222</MAJOR_TAG>
<FOO_FOO>12:12:1222</FOO_FOO>
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much, mate. I appreciate for your help. –  Flextra Oct 11 '11 at 7:53
    
@AutoCoder: You are welcome, mate. –  Dimitre Novatchev Oct 11 '11 at 12:34

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