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I'm using Entity Framework 4.1 Code First and I have a table that has an IDENTITY key, because all new entries in this table should have an auto-generated ID (the ID column is called AccountNumber). I need to import some data from the previous incarnation of this system - these account numbers need to be preserved.

In a previous question, I learned I have to SET IDENTITY_INSERT ON in order to preserve the old account numbers. The idea is that when importing old customers, I'm going to turn IDENTITY_INSERT ON, run a raw SQL insert statement, then turn it off and proceed normally using EF entities.

So, I have the following code:

    public const string InsertQuery = "INSERT INTO dbo.Businesses (AccountNumber, Name, Active, CreatedBy, CreatedOn, ModifiedBy, ModifiedOn) VALUES({0}, {1}, {2}, {3}, {4}, {5}, {6})";

...

            dbContext.Database.ExecuteSqlCommand("SET IDENTITY_INSERT dbo.Businesses ON");
            dbContext.Database.ExecuteSqlCommand(InsertQuery, customerData.AccountNumber, customerData.Name, customerData.Active,
                                                 m_userContextManager.GetCurrentUserName(), Now,
                                                 m_userContextManager.GetCurrentUserName(), Now);
            dbContext.Database.ExecuteSqlCommand("SET IDENTITY_INSERT dbo.Businesses OFF");

            // load the entity and map the rest of the attributes
            dbContext.SaveChanges();

When I get to executing the second statement, I get the following infuriating error (because I've just set it to OFF or so I think):

Cannot insert explicit value for identity column in table 'Businesses' when IDENTITY_INSERT is set to OFF.

The return value from the statement is -1, but because the documentation on MSDN for ExecuteSqlCommand is really inadequate, I have no idea what that means. I would expect an exception to be thrown if the statement failed for some reason. Does anyone know what's going on here?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

There is no need to use plain old ADO.NET; the trick is packing everything into a single command:

public const string InsertQuery = @"
    SET IDENTITY_INSERT dbo.Businesses ON;
    INSERT INTO dbo.Businesses (AccountNumber, Name, Active, CreatedBy, CreatedOn, ModifiedBy, ModifiedOn) VALUES({0}, {1}, {2}, {3}, {4}, {5}, {6});
    SET IDENTITY_INSERT dbo.Businesses OFF;
";

dbContext.Database.ExecuteSqlCommand(InsertQuery, customerData.AccountNumber, customerData.Name, customerData.Active,
                                     m_userContextManager.GetCurrentUserName(), Now,
                                     m_userContextManager.GetCurrentUserName(), Now);

// load the entity and map the rest of the attributes
dbContext.SaveChanges();

Additionally, you can drop SET IDENTITY_INSERT dbo.Businesses OFF (since IDENTITY_INSERT is turned off at the end of the command anyway), and dbContext.SaveChanges(), as ExecuteSqlCommand executes the command immediately; it doesn't wait for SaveChanges().

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Any way that I can save my entity without listing all of it's properties (again - after filling it) ??? –  user2173353 Feb 7 '14 at 11:53
    
Sorry, I don't follow your question. Do you mean to access a Business POCO right after using the method I described in my answer? –  Daniel Liuzzi Feb 7 '14 at 21:10
    
I mean, inserting the POCO that I have filled in in my code without proving it's properties one-by-one (as above). (Of course I also want to use SET IDENTITY_INSERT) –  user2173353 Feb 10 '14 at 9:35
    
Sth like dbContext.Database.InsertWithIdentity(myPOCO);. Probably too much to ask... :( –  user2173353 Feb 10 '14 at 13:03
    
Not that I know, sorry. As its name implies, ExecuteSqlCommand is not actually inserting anything but executing a command. Although in this case the command is a SQL INSERT, it could be anything. So yes, you need to provide values for all parameters your command will need. –  Daniel Liuzzi Feb 10 '14 at 19:32

ExecuteSqlCommand will open the connection, execute the sql and then close it. So your next command will execute using a different connection.

What you can do is use the plain old ADO.net classes to insert the data within a single transaction. Or script the data and execute it as shown here

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That's so kind of them to close the connection immediately after issuing the command... ;) –  Josh Kodroff Oct 12 '11 at 23:24
    
@JoshKodroff :) that is by design. Usually you delay the opening the connection as possible then use it and close it immediately. –  Eranga Oct 12 '11 at 23:46

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