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It came to my attention lately that you can unit test abstract base classes using Moq rather than creating a dummy class in test that implements the abstract base class. See How to use moq to test a concrete method in an abstract class? E.g. you can do:

public abstract class MyAbstractClass 
{
    public virtual void MyMethod()
    {
        // ...    
    }
}

[Test]
public void MyMethodTest()
{
    // Arrange            
    Mock<MyAbstractClass> mock = new Mock<MyAbstractClass>() { CallBase = true };

    // Act
    mock.Object.MyMethod();

    // Assert
    // ... 
}

Now I was wondering if there was a similar technique to allow me to test protected members without having to create a wrapper class. I.e. how do you test this method:

public class MyClassWithProtectedMethod
{
    protected void MyProtectedMethod()
    {

    }
}

I'm aware of the Moq.Protected namespace, however as far as I can see it only allows you to setup expectations with e.g.

mock.Protected().Setup("MyProtectedMethod").Verifiable();

I'm also aware that the obvious answer here is "don't test protected methods, only test public methods", however that's another debate! I just want to know if this is possible using Moq.

Update: below is how I would test this normally:

public class MyClassWithProtectedMethodTester : MyClassWithProtectedMethod
{
    public void MyProtectedMethod()
    {
        base.MyProtectedMethod();
    }
}

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Is this what you want? –  bzlm Oct 10 '11 at 16:14
    
Am really wondering why there is no .Returns(..) for the .Setup(...)- the link to the API doc seems to be broken and I have no VS around right now - you sure that there is no Return? - bzlms post seems to indicate that there is/used to be one... –  Carsten König Oct 10 '11 at 16:14
    
@bzlm No, that's the same as what i've posted above, it lets you set up an expectation that the protected method is called. I want to actually execute the protected method from test. I.e. I want to change the accessibility of the protected method to public for testing purposes, which I can do with a wrapper class. –  magritte Oct 10 '11 at 16:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

For starters, there's no point in unit testing an abstract method. There's no implementation! You may want to unit test an impure abstract class, verifying that the abstract method was called:

[Test]
public void Do_WhenCalled_CallsMyAbstractMethod()
{
    var sutMock = new Mock<MyAbstractClass>() { CallBase = true };
    sutMock.Object.Do();
    sutMock.Verify(x => x.MyAbstractMethod());
}

public abstract class MyAbstractClass
{
    public void Do()
    {
        MyAbstractMethod();
    }

    public abstract void MyAbstractMethod();
}

Note that I set CallBase to turn this into a partial mock, in case Do was virtual. Otherwise Moq would have replaced the implementation of the Do method.

Using Protected() you could verify that a protected method was called in a similar manner.

When you create a mock with Moq or another library, the whole point is overriding implementation. Testing a protected method involves exposing existing implementation. That's not what Moq is designed to do. Protected() just gives you access (presumably through reflection, since it's string-based) to override protected members.

Either write a test descendant class with a method that calls your protected method, or use reflection in the unit test to call the protected method.

Or, better yet, don't test protected methods directly.

share|improve this answer
    
Good spot! Sorry I wrote the question in a hurry as I had a train to catch ;-) I've updated it now. I meant ofc for testing non-abstract methods on an abstract class. –  magritte Oct 10 '11 at 19:19
    
The test descendant class approach is the one I've already been using, I was just interested to know if Moq had a way of doing this for me. The idea came from this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/7691796/… –  magritte Oct 10 '11 at 19:23
    
@TonyLeeper: Not that I'm aware of. You could write a reflection helper that would allow you to access the protected method; that would be very short. –  TrueWill Oct 10 '11 at 21:46
    
I'll accept this as the answer as it's more of a Moq specific answer, and the answer is that you can't. Thanks both. –  magritte Oct 13 '11 at 19:57

You've already touched upon the "test the public API, not private" thought process, and you've also already mentioned the technique of inheriting from the class and then testing its protected members that way. Both of these are valid approaches.

Beneath it all, the simple truth is that you consider this implementation detail (as that's what a private or protected member is) important enough to test directly rather than indirectly via the public API that would use it. If it is this important, perhaps it's important enough to promote to its own class. (After all, if it's so important, perhaps it is a responsibility that MyAbstractClass should not have.) The instance of the class would be protected inside MyAbstractClass, so only the base and derived types would have access to the instance, but the class itself would be fully testable otherwise and usable elsewhere if that became a need.

abstract class MyAbstractClass 
{
     protected ImportantMethodDoer doer;
}

class ImportantMethodDoer
{
     public void Do() { }
}

Otherwise, you're left* to the approaches you've already identified.


*Moq may or may not provide some mechanism for getting at private or protected members, I cannot say, as I do not use that particular tool. My answer is more from an architectural standpoint.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Anthony, I agree with you on all points, however the method in question is the Application_AcquireRequestState(object sender, EventArgs e) event handler in the global.asax.cs of an Asp.Net MVC web application. It's not part of my own codebase. I could mark the method as public but I would be doing so for the purpose of testing only. –  magritte Oct 10 '11 at 18:05

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