Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

It is correct to say that my IService has everything that IRepository has, and more some specific operations?

Following is the code:

public interface IRepository<T>
{
    T Add(T Entity);
    T Remove(T Entity);
    IQueryable<T> GetAll();
}

public interface IUserService
{

    //All operations IRepository
    User Add(User Entity);
    User Remove(User Entity);
    IQueryable<User> GetAll();

    //Others specific operations 
    bool Approve(User usr);
}

Note that all operations in IRepository are also IService.

Is this correct?

If so, it would be better to do something like this:

public interface IUserService : IRepository<User>
{
    bool Approve(User usr);
}

Another option would be:

public interface IUserService
{
    IRepository<User> Repository { get; }

    //All operations IRepository
    User Add(User Entity);
    User Remove(User Entity);
    IQueryable<User> GetAll();

    //Others specific operations 
    bool Approve(User usr);
}

public class UserService : IUserService
{
    private readonly IRepository<User> _repository;
    public IRepository<User> Repository
    {
        get
        {
            return _repository;
        }
    }

    //Others specific operations 
    public bool Approve(User usr) { ... }
}

Note that I put the repository as a property, and in my service class'm exposing this property.

So if you need to add, remove or get some object in the repository I could access it via this property.

What is your opinion? Is correct in doing this?

share|improve this question
    
To prevent your question from being flagged and possibly removed, avoid asking subjective questions where … every answer is equally valid: “What’s your favorite ______?” your answer is provided along with the question, and you expect more answers: “I use ______ for ______, what do you use?” there is no actual problem to be solved: “I’m curious if other people feel like I do.” we are being asked an open-ended, hypothetical question: “What if ______ happened?” it is a rant disguised as a question: “______ sucks, am I right?” –  cadrell0 Oct 10 '11 at 17:29
    
Maybe I'm not knowing how to ask the question. What I want to know is how do I expose the methods of my repository. If I expose them as property in my service, or create methods that access the methods of the repository. –  Ridermansb Oct 10 '11 at 17:37
    
@cadrell0: He provided 3 possible ways of doing something and asked which one of those he should use, not for subjective reasons but for objective ones. –  Daniel Hilgarth Oct 11 '11 at 8:35
    
The last line of the question is "What is your opinion?" To me this falls under "I use _ for _, what do you use?". I've recently gone through this at my job and it is a great question for an extended discussion. It just seems to me that it is not a fit for SO's Q&A format. There is no one correct answer to this question, and the selected answer will be based on personal preference. –  cadrell0 Oct 11 '11 at 12:55
    
I got it, actually in my context, to expose the repository as a property would be ideal. If there is no one correct answer, and have no problems in exposing the repository, this would be what to do. –  Ridermansb Oct 11 '11 at 13:14

1 Answer 1

You've probably already worked this out for yourself, but I will offer an opinion anyway.
Your second example:

public interface IUserService : IRepository<User>
{
    bool Approve(User usr);
}

is what you should use - it is nice and clean. Most of the stuff included in IUserService in your first example was totally redundant, the only thing IUserService actually adds is bool Approve(User usr). You will also find that if you use your second example, when you add the UserService and get Visual Studio to automatically implement IUserService you end up with the following:

public class UserService : IUserService
{
    public bool Approve(User usr)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public User Add(User Entity)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public User Remove(User Entity)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public IQueryable<User> GetAll()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

public class User { }

public interface IRepository<T>
{
    T Add(T Entity);
    T Remove(T Entity);
    IQueryable<T> GetAll();
}

public interface IUserService : IRepository<User>
{
    bool Approve(User usr);
}

As you can see, the types are all correctly populated for you, without having to do anything extra in IUserService.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, I was thinking about exposing the repository as property; What do you think? –  Ridermansb Oct 11 '11 at 13:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.