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Does anyone have code to compare two version numbers in JavaScript? I just want simple version comparisons (e.g. "1.0" vs "1.5.6"), and it should work with numbers or strings. It can ignore trailing beta identifiers like "1.5.6b4", but can otherwise expect the strings to be well-formed. The function should return a signed integer like a normal cmp function.

function cmpVersion(a, b)
  return less than one if a < b
  return 0 if a == b
  return greater than one if a > b

I have an answer, but will choose a better or more elegant solution over my own.

(I am using this to compare jQuery.browser.version numbers, but the answer will be more widely applicable)

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5 Answers 5

If you do not care about the .5.6, use parseInt

var majorV = parseInt("1.5.6",10)

Since you said you care about the minor versions:

function cmpVersion(v1, v2) {
    if(v1===v2) return 0;
    var a1 = v1.toString().split(".");
    var a2 = v2.toString().split(".");
    for( var i = 0; i < a1.length && i < a2.length; i++ ) {
        var diff = parseInt(a1[i],10) - parseInt(a2[i],10);
        if( diff>0 ) {
            return 1;
        }
        else if( diff<0 ) {
            return -1;
        }
    }
    diff = a1.length - a2.length;
    return (diff>0) ? 1 : (diff<0) ? -1 : 0;
}

console.log( cmpVersion( "1.0", "1.56") );
console.log( cmpVersion( "1.56", "1.56") );
console.log( cmpVersion( "1.65", "1.5.6") );
console.log( cmpVersion( "1.0", "1.5.6b3") );
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According to that approach, 1.9.5 == 1.0.1. Assuming OP doesn't care about anything but the major version is a pretty bold assumption. –  delnan Oct 10 '11 at 18:42
    
I absolutely care about the .5.6 –  theazureshadow Oct 10 '11 at 18:43
up vote 6 down vote accepted
function cmpVersion(a, b) {
    var i, cmp, len, re = /(\.0)+[^\.]*$/;
    a = (a + '').replace(re, '').split('.');
    b = (b + '').replace(re, '').split('.');
    len = Math.min(a.length, b.length);
    for( i = 0; i < len; i++ ) {
        cmp = parseInt(a[i], 10) - parseInt(b[i], 10);
        if( cmp !== 0 ) {
            return cmp;
        }
    }
    return a.length - b.length;
}

function gteVersion(a, b) {
    return cmpVersion(a, b) >= 0;
}
function ltVersion(a, b) {
    return cmpVersion(a, b) < 0;
}

This function handles:

  • numbers or strings as input
  • trailing zeros (e.g. cmpVersion("1.0", 1) returns 0)
  • ignores trailing alpha, b, pre4, etc
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If you want to be fully correct, take a look at the discussion on PEP386, especially the heading “the new versioning algorithm”.

Otherwise it seems like your answer is pretty good.

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1  
+1: "Version numbering for anarchists and software realists." I like it. I'm not sure I want to handle all edge cases, but this is a great reference. Thanks! –  theazureshadow Oct 10 '11 at 18:48
function compareVersion(a, b) {
    return compareVersionRecursive(a.split("."), b.split("."));
}

function compareVersionRecursive(a, b) {
    if (a.length == 0) {
        a = [0];
    }
    if (b.length == 0) {
        b = [0];
    }
    if (a[0] != b[0] || (a.length == 1 && b.length == 1)) {
        return a[0] - b[0];
    }
    return compareVersionRecursive(a.slice(1), b.slice(1));
}
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npm uses a nice syntax to compare versions and you can get the same module here: https://github.com/isaacs/node-semver

The following range styles are supported:

  • 1.2.3 A specific version. When nothing else will do. Note that build metadata is still ignored, so 1.2.3+build2012 will satisfy this range.
  • >1.2.3 Greater than a specific version.
  • <1.2.3 Less than a specific version. If there is no prerelease tag on the version range, then no prerelease version will be allowed either, even though these are technically "less than".
  • >=1.2.3 Greater than or equal to. Note that prerelease versions are NOT equal to their "normal" equivalents, so 1.2.3-beta will not satisfy this range, but 2.3.0-beta will.
  • <=1.2.3 Less than or equal to. In this case, prerelease versions ARE allowed, so 1.2.3-beta would satisfy.
  • 1.2.3 - 2.3.4 := >=1.2.3 <=2.3.4
  • ~1.2.3 := >=1.2.3-0 <1.3.0-0 "Reasonably close to 1.2.3". When using tilde operators, prerelease versions are supported as well, but a prerelease of the next significant digit will NOT be satisfactory, so 1.3.0-beta will not satisfy ~1.2.3.
  • ^1.2.3 := >=1.2.3-0 <2.0.0-0 "Compatible with 1.2.3". When using caret operators, anything from the specified version (including prerelease) will be supported up to, but not including, the next major version (or its prereleases). 1.5.1 will satisfy ^1.2.3, while 1.2.2 and 2.0.0-beta will not.
  • ^0.1.3 := >=0.1.3-0 <0.2.0-0 "Compatible with 0.1.3". 0.x.x versions are special: the first non-zero component indicates potentially breaking changes, meaning the caret operator matches any version with the same first non-zero component starting at the specified version.
  • ^0.0.2 := =0.0.2 "Only the version 0.0.2 is considered compatible"
  • ~1.2 := >=1.2.0-0 <1.3.0-0 "Any version starting with 1.2"
  • ^1.2 := >=1.2.0-0 <2.0.0-0 "Any version compatible with 1.2"
  • 1.2.x := >=1.2.0-0 <1.3.0-0 "Any version starting with 1.2"
  • ~1 := >=1.0.0-0 <2.0.0-0 "Any version starting with 1"
  • ^1 := >=1.0.0-0 <2.0.0-0 "Any version compatible with 1"
  • 1.x := >=1.0.0-0 <2.0.0-0 "Any version starting with 1"

Ranges can be joined with either a space (which implies "and") or a || (which implies "or").

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