Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My python program loops through a bunch of csv-files, read them, and write specific columns in the file to another csv file. While the program runs, i can see the files being written in the correct manner, but once the program is finished, all the files i've just written become empty.

The solution to all the other similar threads seems to be closing the file you write to properly, but i cant seem to figure out what im doing wrong. Anyone?

import os
import csv

def ensure_dir(f):
    d = os.path.dirname(f)
    if not os.path.exists(d):
        os.makedirs(d)

readpath = os.path.join("d:\\", "project")
savepath=os.path.join("d:\\", "save")
ensure_dir(savepath)
contents_1=os.listdir(readpath)
for i in contents_1[1:len(contents_1)]:
    readpath_2=os.path.join(readpath, i)
    if os.path.isdir(readpath_2)== True :
        contents_2=os.listdir(readpath_2)
        for i in contents_2:
            readpath_3=os.path.join(readpath_2, i)
            if os.path.isfile(readpath_3)== True :
                savefile=savepath + "\\" + i
                savefile = open(savefile, 'wb')
                writer = csv.writer(savefile, delimiter=';')
                readfile=open(readpath_3, 'rb')
                reader = csv.reader(readfile, delimiter=';')
                try:
                    for row in reader:
                        writer.writerow([row[0], row[3]])
                except:
                    print(i)
                finally:
                    savefile.close()
                    readfile.close()
share|improve this question
    
You should use try..finally or the with-Statement for a clean file access without these problems. –  schlamar Oct 10 '11 at 19:03
    
Which operating system are you working on? –  Martey Oct 10 '11 at 19:04
    
Im using windows 7 –  user587650 Oct 10 '11 at 19:07
1  
Not that either of these is your problem, but adding == True to a conditional is redundant (and a bit silly), and using + "\\" + i to build a path instead of using os.path.join breaks compatibility with non-Windows OSes. –  Wooble Oct 10 '11 at 19:10
    
@ms4py adding a finally doesnt seem to solve the problem. I was hoping there would be a solution without having to use the with-statement. –  user587650 Oct 10 '11 at 19:16
show 12 more comments

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

savefile=savepath + "\\" + i is the error. If both "d:\\project\a\x.csv" and "d:\\project\b\x.csv" exist, then you will write to savepath + "\\" + i more than once. If the second path as an empty "x.csv", then it would overwrite the result with an empty file.

Try this instead:

import os
import csv

def ensure_dir(f):
    d = os.path.dirname(f)
    if not os.path.exists(d):
        os.makedirs(d)

readpath = os.path.join("d:\\", "project")
savepath = os.path.join("d:\\", "save")

ensure_dir(savepath)

for dname in os.listdir(readpath)[1:]:
    readpath_2 = os.path.join(dname, fname)
    if not os.path.isdir(readpath_2):
        continue
    for fname in os.listdir(readpath_2)
        fullfname = os.path.join(readpath_2, fname)
        if not os.path.isfile(fullfname):
            continue
        savefile = open(savepath + "\\" + dname + "_" + fname, wb)
        writer = csv.writer(savefile, delimiter=';')
        readfile=open(fullfname, 'rb')
        reader = csv.reader(readfile, delimiter=';')
        try:
            for row in reader:
                writer.writerow([row[0], row[3]])
        except:
            print(i)
        finally:
            savefile.close()
            readfile.close()

This code could be greatly improved with os.walk

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, works like a charm. And thanks for the tip on os.walk. –  user587650 Oct 10 '11 at 21:12
add comment

Quoting from the python documentation:

If csvfile is a file object, it must be opened with the ‘b’ flag on platforms where that makes a difference.

Change the 'w' and 'r' flags to 'wb' and 'rb'.

share|improve this answer
    
Your advice is good, but that would not cause empty files. –  Steven Rumbalski Oct 10 '11 at 19:26
    
Thanks, i tried it but it doesnt seem to work. –  user587650 Oct 10 '11 at 19:27
add comment

(1) Your outer loop AND your inner loop both use i as the loop variable. This has no hope of (a) being understood by a human (b) working properly.

(2) except: print(i) ... What??? I'd suggest you remove the try/except and fix any bugs that you come across.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.