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I want to make my C++ project cross platform, and I'm considering using Cygwin/MinGW. But what is the difference between them ?

Another question is whether I will be able to run the binary on a system without Cygwin/MinGW ?

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14 Answers 14

up vote 117 down vote accepted

Cygwin is an attempt to create a complete UNIX/POSIX environment on Windows. To do this it uses various DLLs. While these DLLs are covered by GPLv3+, their license contains an exception that does not force a derived work to be covered by the GPLv3+. MinGW is a C/C++ compiler suite which allows you to create Windows executables without dependency on such DLLs - you only need the normal MSVC runtimes, which are part of any normal Microsoft Windows installation.

You can also get a small UNIX/POSIX like environment, compiled with MinGW called MSYS. It doesn't have anywhere near all the features of Cygwin, but is ideal for programmers wanting to use MinGW.

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Sorry Neil, but to say that the license is user-unfriendly is wrong and misleading, whatever your feelings on copyleft are. Cygwin is dual licensed Free software; either the GPL or a commercial license for proprietary use. That's about as user friendly as you can get and still hope to make any money on the venture. cygwin.com/faq/faq-nochunks.html#faq.what.free - it is not "friendly" to folk that want to distribute non-GPL'd proprietary software without a commercial license, but that is not a user issue. –  richq Jan 2 '10 at 15:02
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But if I want to release free non-GPL software? Sorry, I'm not a GPL fan, is all. –  anon Jan 2 '10 at 15:05
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@Neil: It cuts both ways. If you want to redistribute Microsoft's MSVC runtimes, you must comply with their redistributables license. But what if I want to release software that doesn't comply? Sorry, I'm not a Microsoft fan, is all ;) –  Dan Moulding Jul 13 '10 at 22:48
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@Dan You don't need to redistribute the runtime that MinGW uses - it's part of Windows. –  anon Jul 13 '10 at 22:50
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@ak2: that is true, but misleading. cygwyn gcc + cygwin environment defaults to producing binaries linked to the (GPL) cygwin dll. mingw + msys defaults to producing binaries linked to the platform C lib. –  Sean McMillan Jun 2 '11 at 20:49

As a simplification, it's like this:

  • Compile something in Cygwin and you are compiling it for Cygwin.

  • Compile something in MingW and you are compiling it for Windows.

About Cygwin

The purpose of Cygwin is to make porting *nix-based applications to Windows much easier, by emulating many of the small details that Unix-based operating systems provide, and are documented by the POSIX standards. If your application assumes that it can use Unix feature such as pipes, Unix-style file and directory access, and so forth, then you can compile it in Cygwin and Cygwin itself will act as a compatibility layer around your application, so that many of these Unix-specific paradigms can continue to be used with little or no modification to your application.

If you want to compile something for Cygwin and distribute that resulting application, you must also distribute the Cygwin run-time environment (provided by cygwin1.dll) along with it, and this has implications for what types of software license you may use.

About MingW

MingW is a Windows port of the GNU compiler tools, such as GCC, Make, Bash, and so on. It does not attempt to emulate or provide comprehensive compatibility with Unix, but instead it provides the minimum necessary environment to use GCC (the GNU compiler) and a small number of other tools on Windows. It does not have a Unix emulation layer like Cygwin, but as a result your application needs to specifically be programmed to be able to run in Windows, which may mean significant alteration if it was created to rely on being run in a standard Unix environment and uses Unix-specific features such as those mentioned earlier. By default, code compiled in MingW's GCC will compile to a native Windows X86 target, including .exe and .dll files, though you could also cross-compile with the right settings. MingW is an open-source alternative to Microsoft Visual C++ compiler and its associated linking/make tools.

Considerably sophisticated cross-platform frameworks exist which make the task of porting applications to various operating systems easily - for example the Qt framework is a popular framework for cross-platform applications. If you use such a framework from the start, you can not only reduce your headaches when it comes time to port to another platform but you can use the same graphical widgets - windows, menus and controls - across all platforms if you're writing a GUI app.

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The bash that comes with MinGW is not a native Windows program. It depends on the MSYS DLL, which is a fork of the Cygwin DLL. Same for many of the other Unix utilities that come with MinGW/MSYS. MinGW gcc indeed is a native program though. Make is available both in a native version and an MSYS one. –  ak2 Mar 7 '12 at 10:23
    
Your description is well accepted and understood by my mind :) –  Ahmed Jun 22 '12 at 20:08
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any differences in terms of speed ? –  docesam Feb 27 at 19:33
    
The difference in speed will be ignorable in most situations. Any difference will come down to how much the additional level of abstraction provided by the cygwin compatibility layer slows things down. It may have a measurable effect on things like I/O. For instance, a long time back, Git only ran on Windows in cygwin, and because of that it was quite a bit slower. Then again, if you code using a framework, that's also an abstraction layer with the potential to slow some things down anyway. –  thomasrutter Feb 28 at 1:28
    
I should note that code compiled for cygwin is still native code - it doesn't need to run through an interpreter like say Java. It's just that when it needs to interact with certain OS features like disk/file it goes through another layer. –  thomasrutter Feb 28 at 1:31

To add to the other answers, Cygwin comes with the MingW libaries and headers and you can compile without linking to the cygwin1.dll by using -mno-cygwin flag with gcc. I greatly prefer this to using plain MingW and MSYS.

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+1. I did not know that. –  j_random_hacker May 3 '09 at 8:15
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This does not work any more with cygwin 1.7.6. gcc: The -mno-cygwin flag has been removed; use a mingw-targeted cross-compiler. –  sigjuice Aug 30 '10 at 8:06
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@sigjuice: true, but the old -mno-cygwin flag still works for GCC 3.x: gcc-3 -mno-cygwin –  Amro Sep 4 '11 at 13:33

Wikipedia does a comparison here.

From Cygwin's website:

  • Cygwin is a Linux-like environment for Windows. It consists of two parts: A DLL (cygwin1.dll) which acts as a Linux API emulation layer providing substantial Linux API functionality.
  • A collection of tools which provide Linux look and feel.

From Mingw's website:

MinGW ("Minimalistic GNU for Windows") is a collection of freely available and freely distributable Windows specific header files and import libraries combined with GNU toolsets that allow one to produce native Windows programs that do not rely on any 3rd-party C runtime DLLs

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Cygwin uses a DLL, cygwin.dll, (or maybe a set of DLLs) to provide a POSIX-like runtime on Windows.

MinGW compiles to a native Win32 application.

If you build something with Cygwin, any system you install it to will also need the Cygwin DLL(s). A MinGW application does not need any special runtime.

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Read these answered questions to understand the difference between Cygwin and MinGW.


Question #1: I want to create an application that I write source code once, compile it once and run it in any platforms (e.g. Windows, Linux and Mac OS X…).

Answer #1: Write your source code in JAVA. Compile the source code once and run it anywhere.


Question #2: I want to create an application that I write source code once but there is no problem that I compile the source code for any platforms separately (e.g. Windows, Linux and Mac OS X …).

Answer #2: Write your source code in C or C++. Use standard header files only. Use a suitable compiler for any platform (e.g. Visual Studio for Windows, GCC for Linux and XCode for Mac). Note that you should not use any advanced programming features to compile your source code in all platforms successfully. If you use none C or C++ standard classes or functions, your source code does not compile in other platforms.


Question #3: In answer of question #2, it is difficult using different compiler for each platform, is there any cross platform compiler?

Answer #3: Yes, Use GCC compiler. It is a cross platform compiler. To compile your source code in Windows use MinGW that provides GCC compiler for Windows and compiles your source code to native Windows program. Do not use any advanced programming features (like Windows API) to compile your source code in all platforms successfully. If you use Windows API functions, your source code does not compile in other platforms.


Question #4: C or C++ standard header files do not provide any advanced programming features like multi-threading. What can I do?

Answer #4: You should use POSIX (Portable Operating System Interface [for UNIX]) standard. It provides many advanced programming features and tools. Many operating systems fully or partly POSIX compatible (like Mac OS X, Solaris, BSD/OS and ...). Some operating systems while not officially certified as POSIX compatible, conform in large part (like Linux, FreeBSD, OpenSolaris and ...). Cygwin provides a largely POSIX-compliant development and run-time environment for Microsoft Windows.


Thus:

To use advantage of GCC cross platform compiler in Windows, use MinGW.

To use advantage of POSIX standard advanced programming features and tools in Windows, use Cygwin.

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About your little faq: 1) Your right, if you need something that runs anywhere and doesn't need to be compiled choose something like java (also don't forget python, perl, ruby and the rest of the script languages) 2) This is somewhat wrong for the case of C, since all compilers of C, support it very well. 3) You can still use win32 api, but you have to wrap it in a portability layer, so that is only a design problem. –  Coyote21 Sep 26 '11 at 20:39
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4) This is totally wrong, because of the reasons I give above, since POSIX is only other api, also if you defend so much POSIX, you should know that even Unices don't need to implement the same set of POSIX, so how do you deal with that? The real time POSIX api comes to mind. And that makes you conclusion completely bogus and wrong, because you don't need POSIX for anything in windows, you can just use the Win32 API. Or how do you think that Qt , GTK and WxWidgets have found a way to be cross-platform, I guess that they all have to use cygwin in windows. -1 vote for your answer. –  Coyote21 Sep 26 '11 at 20:39
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I don't understand your argument, @Coyote21. Are you saying that POSIX is unsuitable for cross-platform development? Are you saying that the only appropriate way to write code in C/C++ for multiple platforms is to write your own compatibility layer for each platform you wish to support? I don't see anything wrong with the suggestion to start with POSIX. You do need to see how far it can get you and whether an extensive compatibility layer solution will be required. Large compatibility layers are not the norm. To say otherwise is to argue that POSIX is a complete failure. –  David Gladfelter Oct 22 '12 at 23:05

Don't overlook AT&T's U/Win software, which is designed to help you compile Unix applications on windows. Like Cygwin they have to run against a library; in their case POSIX.DLL. The AT&T guys are terrific engineers (same group that brought you ksh and dot) and their stuff is worth checking out.

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Wow, those are some bad web pages. I was finally able to find a download link at www2.research.att.com/sw/download, but no online documentation or information about the project. –  Fantius Feb 2 '12 at 1:24

Note that utility behaviour can genuinely vary between the two.

For example, Cygwin tar can fork - because fork() is supported in the DLL - where the mingw version cannot. This is a problem when trying to compile mysql from source.

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Cygwin emulates entire POSIX environment, while MinGW is minimal tool set for compilation only (compiles native Win application.) So if you want to make your project cross-platform the choice between the two is obvious, MinGW.

Although you might consider using VS on Windows, GCC on Linux/Unices. Most open source projects do that (e.g. Firefox or Python).

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Wikipedia Says:

MinGW forked from version 1.3.3 of Cygwin. Although both Cygwin and MinGW can be used to port UNIX software to Windows, they have different approaches: Cygwin aims to provide a complete POSIX layer that provides emulations of several system calls and libraries that exist on Linux, UNIX, and the BSD variants. The POSIX layer runs on top of Windows, sacrificing performance where necessary for compatibility. Accordingly, this approach requires Windows programs written with Cygwin to run on top of a copylefted compatibility library that must be distributed with the program, along with the program's source code. MinGW aims to provide native functionality and performance via direct Windows API calls. Unlike Cygwin, MinGW does not require a compatibility layer DLL and thus programs do not need to be distributed with source code.

Because MinGW is dependent upon Windows API calls, it cannot provide a full POSIX API; it is unable to compile some UNIX applications that can be compiled with Cygwin. Specifically, this applies to applications that require POSIX functionality like fork(), mmap() or ioctl() and those that expect to be run in a POSIX environment. Applications written using a cross-platform library that has itself been ported to MinGW, such as SDL, wxWidgets, Qt, or GTK+, will usually compile as easily in MinGW as they would in Cygwin.

The combination of MinGW and MSYS provides a small, self-contained environment that can be loaded onto removable media without leaving entries in the registry or files on the computer. Cygwin Portable provides a similar feature. By providing more functionality, Cygwin becomes more complicated to install and maintain.

It is also possible to cross-compile Windows applications with MinGW-GCC under POSIX systems. This means that developers do not need a Windows installation with MSYS to compile software that will run on Windows without Cygwin.

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Cygwin is is a Unix-like environment and command-line interface for Microsoft Windows.

Mingw is a native software port of the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) to Microsoft Windows, along with a set of freely distributable import libraries and header files for the Windows API. MinGW allows developers to create native Microsoft Windows applications.

You can run binaries generated with mingw without the cygwin environment, provided that all necessary libraries (DLLs) are present.

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Looks like MSYS is an old cygwin fork. I prefer mingw binaries since they seem to be easier to use (with no installation), but if you want a full environment, not sure what the advantage of MSYS opposed to cygwin bash would be.

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Cygwin is designed to provide a more-or-less complete POSIX environment for Windows, including an extensive set of tools designed to provide a full-fledged Linux-like platform. In comparison, MinGW and MSYS provide a lightweight, minimalist POSIX-like layer, with only the more essential tools like gcc and bash available, and produces. Because of MinGW's more minimalist approach, it does not provide the degree of POSIX API coverage Cygwin offers, and therefore cannot build certain programs which can otherwise be compiled on Cygwin.

In terms of the code generated by the two, the Cygwin toolchain relies on dynamic linking to a large runtime library, cygwin1.dll, while the MinGW toolchain compiles code to binaries that link dynamically to the Windows native C library msvcrt.dll as well as statically to parts of glibc. Cygwin executables are therefore more compact but require a separate redistributable DLL, while MinGW binaries can be shipped standalone but tend to be larger.

The fact that Cygwin-based programs require a separate DLL to run also leads to licensing restrictions. The Cygwin runtime library is licensed under GPLv3 with a linking exception for applications with OSI-compliant licenses, so developers wishing to build a closed-source application around Cygwin must acquire a commercial license from Red Hat. On the other hand, MinGW code can be used in both open-source and closed-source applications, as the headers and libraries are permissively licensed.

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Cygwin uses a compatibility layer, while MinGW is native. That is the difference.

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